hyperostosis


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hy·per·os·to·sis

 (hī′pər-ŏ-stō′sĭs)
n. pl. hy·per·os·to·ses (-sēz)
Excessive or abnormal thickening or growth of bone tissue.


hy′per·os·tot′ic (-ŏ-stŏt′ĭk) adj.

hyperostosis

(ˌhaɪpərɒˈstəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Pathology) an abnormal enlargement of the outer layer of a bone
2. (Pathology) a bony growth arising from the root of a tooth or from the surface of a bone
hyperostotic adj

hy•per•os•to•sis

(ˌhaɪ pər ɒˈstoʊ sɪs)

n.
excessive growth of bony tissue.
[1825–35; hyper- + Greek ost(éon) bone + -osis]
hy`per•os•tot′ic (-ɒˈstɒt ɪk) adj.
Translations

hy·per·os·to·sis

n. hiperostosis, desarrollo excesivo del tejido óseo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vitamin A in mega doses may cause serious liver damage, bone cortical hyperostosis, benign intracranial hypertension, pseudo-cerebri etc.
Patrick, 68, was desperate to rest his legs and suffers from Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis, which causes bone spurs due to the body calcifying tissues.
Though some radiological features on conventional neuroimaging like intratumoral cystic change, hyperostosis of the adjacent skull, bony destruction, extracranial tumor extension through the skull base, arterial encasement, and peritumoral brain edema have been found to distinguish these two entities; no single feature has been found to be highly reliable.8 Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a non-invasive technique, based on the measurement of water diffusion in tissues, which provides information about tissue microstructures, important in the grading of tumors before surgery.9
(1.) Burton K, Glanc P Prenatal presentation of lethal variant infantile cortical hyperostosis. Ultrasound Q.
Computed tomographic examination of the anterior chest wall revealed hyperostosis and fusion of the first costosternal and manubriosternal joints (Figure 1b).
Some individuals with the same genetic defect develop hyperphosphatemic hyperostosis syndrome (HHS), a condition which was formerly described as a distinct entity (5).
The prevalence of hyperostosis over the age of 50 is 15% in women and 25% in men.
No evidence of mycobacterial infection of the skeletal system was seen radiographically, although hyperostosis of the legs was observed.
The damage to spinal nerves may be caused by impingement from degenerative changes in the spine (for example, osteoarthritic changes, kyphosis, vertebral hyperostosis) or compression by muscle fibers (6-8).
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: clinical features and pathogenic mechanisms.
There is a published case report of a failed VL intubation in a patient with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and spinal cord injury who was rescued with a fiberoptic intubation (13).
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