hyperostosis

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hy·per·os·to·sis

 (hī′pər-ŏ-stō′sĭs)
n. pl. hy·per·os·to·ses (-sēz)
Excessive or abnormal thickening or growth of bone tissue.


hy′per·os·tot′ic (-ŏ-stŏt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hyperostosis

(ˌhaɪpərɒˈstəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Pathology) an abnormal enlargement of the outer layer of a bone
2. (Pathology) a bony growth arising from the root of a tooth or from the surface of a bone
hyperostotic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•per•os•to•sis

(ˌhaɪ pər ɒˈstoʊ sɪs)

n.
excessive growth of bony tissue.
[1825–35; hyper- + Greek ost(éon) bone + -osis]
hy`per•os•tot′ic (-ɒˈstɒt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

hy·per·os·to·sis

n. hiperostosis, desarrollo excesivo del tejido óseo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
[.sup.18]F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography fusion images showed increased activity in the sternoclavicular joints (arthritis) and hyperostotic lesions (osteitis) (Figure 1c).
Its bone lesions can be unifocal of multifocal, initially osteolytic, and posteriorly sclerotic or hyperostotic [2].
In T2DM, hyperostotic changes are frequent in the form of hyperostotic spondylosis, osteitis condensans ilii, and tendon or ligament calcification.
Presence of repeating hyperostotic bones in dorsal pterygiophores of the oarfish.
Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors contribute to apoptosis of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord of spinal hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy) sustaining chronic mechanical compression.
Lenz-Majewski Hyperostotic Dwarfism (LMHD) is an extremely rare congenital, sclerosing bone dysplasia that causes cranio-tubular hyperostosis, ectodermal dysplasia (cutis laxa and enamel hypoplasia), osseous dysgenesis of hands and feet with diaphyseal cortical thickening of tubular bones and intellectual disability.
Computed tomography (CT) was performed and a non-specific soft tissue mass filling the middle ear and mastoid cavities, associated with a hyperostosis of the temporal bone and a hairy aspect of the margins of this hyperostotic boney reaction, was seen on the right side (Figure 1).
SAPHO syndrome is a distinct clinical entity with characteristic dermatologic and osteoarticular abnormalities and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sclerotic and hyperostotic bone lesions in low-stage cancers to prevent the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with malignancy [8].
Nakajima et al., "Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors contribute to apoptosis of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord of spinal hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy) sustaining chronic mechanical compression," Spine, vol.
Iwasaki, "Hyperostotic lumbar spinal stenosis: a review of 12 surgically treated cases with roentgenographic survey of ossification of the yellow ligament at the lumbar spine," Spine, vol.
MRI with contrast typically shows an enhancing, dural-based, soft tissue mass, while CT shows a hyperostotic bone reaction and a hairy aspect of margins of the affected bone.
6) In the Bone window setting, Bilateral IAC are widen with erosion of IAC on the left side without abnormal hyperostotic bony lesion (Fig.