hyperreactive


Also found in: Medical.

hyperreactive

(ˌhaɪpərɪˈæktɪv)
adj
exhibiting an exaggerated reaction to stimuli
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References in periodicals archive ?
In some situations, this uncertainty might cause officers to overestimate the risks during pretextual stops and respond in hyperreactive and overaggressive ways that increase the likelihood of escalation.
Immunological characteristics of hyperreactive malarial splenomegaly syndrome in sudanese patients.
"Another major benefit of omega-3 fatty acids is their capacity to modulate autoimmunity through their influence in downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production and suppression of hyperreactive T-cells (Isr Med Assoc J, 2002)."
Platelets were not only active in periodontitis patients but also hyperreactive. Platelets were thought to become less reactive after provision of non-surgical periodontal therapy.
Further, the elevated Cortisol levels achieved during alcohol intoxication may be compensating for hyperreactive glucocorticoid signaling and lower Cortisol levels.
This suggests that the mechanism for regulating BP which is possessed by these individuals is hyperreactive. The CPT is a satisfactory method of determining the reactivity of the BP.
Sensory modulation dysfunction, one pattern of SPD, usually includes (a) individuals who are overresponsive (i.e., hyperreactive, sensory sensitive, and sensory avoiding) and who experience sensations that most individuals perceive as benign as aversive, uncomfortable, and/or painful; (b) individuals who are underresponsive (e.g., hyporeactive, low sensory registration) and who are slow to respond or have a muted response to sensory experiences of typical intensity; and (c) individuals who are sensory cravers (e.g., sensory seekers) and who have an insatiable need for sensation beyond what is observed in typically developing individuals (Miller, Coll, & Schoen, 2007).
Bloemen, "Strenuous exercise induces a hyperreactive rebalanced haemostatic state that is more pronounced in men," Thrombosis and Haemostasis, vol.
In chemical terms, [H.sub.2][O.sub.2] can act as a mild oxidizing agent or as a mild reducing agent, but it does not readily oxidize most biological molecules, including lipids, DNA, and proteins, unless the latter have hyperreactive thiol groups or methionine residues [8].
In the same way, several recent studies have shown that chronic periodontal disease is associated with hyperreactive neutrophils that have increased the production of reactive oxygen species as a response to stimulation of the Fc-gamma receptor [4].
These events predispose VWM cells to stressinduced hyperreactive damage [6-8].