hyperreactive


Also found in: Medical.

hyperreactive

(ˌhaɪpərɪˈæktɪv)
adj
exhibiting an exaggerated reaction to stimuli
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hyperreactive, sensory sensitive, and sensory avoiding) and who experience sensations that most individuals perceive as benign as aversive, uncomfortable, and/or painful; (b) individuals who are underresponsive (e.
Other words that help us to understand "activation" would include hyperreactive, over-excited, fragile, or trigger-happy.
Participants whose SBP increases by 25 or more mmHg or whose DBP increases by 20 or more mmHg are considered to be hyperreactive.
51] In addition, a higher frequency of the Panx1-400C allele was found in cardiovascular patients with hyperreactive platelets compared to those with hyporeactive platelets.
Freon) powered MDIs can cause bronchospasm of hyperreactive airways.
Furthermore, this hyperreactive immune system is accompanied by abnormally high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the resulting oxidative stress (OxS) phenomenon has been considered as a potential etiological factor for CD.
There were slightly decreased muscle power and hyperreactive tendon reflexes with a positive Barbinski sign contralaterally.
Hyperreactive malarious splenomegaly (HMS), known as Tropical Splenomegaly Syndrome, (1) despite being common in malaria-endemic regions and in travelers from non-endemic areas, (2) has low prevalence in Brazil.
Men flee because their bodies are hard-wired biologically to be hyperreactive to stress and danger, a programming that dates back to prehistoric times when men were hunters and needed to react with lightning speed: to flee or to fight dangerous prey.
As secondary outcomes, we examined pneumonia with concurrent wheezing (a marker of hyperreactive airways), all-cause, and nonpneumonia readmissions, as well as all-cause mortality.
Ivermectin treatment of hyperreactive onchodermatitis (sowda) in Liberia.
Therefore, these patients needed assistance to remove secretions, unlike the subjects in Lee and Eccles, who reported a recent upper respiratory tract infection and thus were more likely to have hyperreactive airways and so be more responsive to respiratory tract stimuli [11].