hypersensitive

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Related to hypersensitiveness: delayed hypersensitivity, Food hypersensitivity

hy·per·sen·si·tive

 (hī′pər-sĕn′sĭ-tĭv)
adj.
1. Highly or excessively sensitive.
2. Responding excessively to the stimulus of a foreign agent, such as an allergen.

hy′per·sen′si·tive·ness, hy′per·sen′si·tiv′i·ty n.
hy′per·sen′si·tize′ (-tīz′) v.

hypersensitive

(ˌhaɪpəˈsɛnsɪtɪv)
adj
1. having unduly vulnerable feelings
2. (Pathology) abnormally sensitive to an allergen, a drug, or other agent
ˌhyperˈsensitiveness, ˌhyperˌsensiˈtivity n

hy•per•sen•si•tive

(ˌhaɪ pərˈsɛn sɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. excessively sensitive: hypersensitive to criticism.
2. allergic to a substance to which most people do not normally react.
[1870–75]
hy`per•sen`si•tiv′i•ty, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hypersensitive - having an allergy or peculiar or excessive susceptibility (especially to a specific factor)hypersensitive - having an allergy or peculiar or excessive susceptibility (especially to a specific factor); "allergic children"; "hypersensitive to pollen"
susceptible - (often followed by `of' or `to') yielding readily to or capable of; "susceptible to colds"; "susceptible of proof"
Translations

hypersensitive

[ˈhaɪpəˈsensɪtɪv] ADJhipersensible

hypersensitive

[ˌhaɪpərˈsɛnsɪtɪv] adj
(= touchy) → hypersensible

hypersensitive

[ˌhaɪpəˈsɛnsɪtɪv] adj (physically) → ipersensibile; (easily offended) (pej) → permaloso/a

hypersensitive

a. hipersensible, hiperestísico-a.

hypersensitive

adj hipersensible
References in classic literature ?
She remained quiet, for she had learned the hypersensitiveness induced by drink and was fastidiously careful not to hurt him even with the knowledge that she had lain awake for him.
Sensitivity Does not display emotional hypersensitiveness, does not display anger during minor events, and is open and cooperative to peers when engaging in play.
The exclusion criteria were (1) dermatologic toxicities not induced by targeted anticancer agents; (2) concurrent acne vulgaris, eczema, psoriasis, and other skin diseases; (3) skin hypersensitiveness; and (4) intellectual and mental disorders, abnormal language expression ability, and an inability to judge or express their own symptoms.