hypha

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Related to hyphal: hyphae

hy·pha

 (hī′fə)
n. pl. hy·phae (-fē)
1. Any of the threadlike filaments forming the mycelium of a fungus.
2. Any of the threadlike filaments produced by certain bacteria.

[New Latin, from Greek huphē, web; see webh- in Indo-European roots.]

hy′phal adj.

hypha

(ˈhaɪfə)
n, pl -phae (-fiː)
(Botany) any of the filaments that constitute the body (mycelium) of a fungus
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek huphē web]
ˈhyphal adj

hy•pha

(ˈhaɪ fə)

n., pl. -phae (-fē).
(in a fungus) one of the threadlike elements of the mycelium.
[1865–70; < New Latin < Greek hyphḗ web]
hy′phal, adj.

hy·pha

(hī′fə)
Plural hyphae (hī′fē)
One of the long slender tubes that form the structural parts of the body of a fungus. Masses of hyphae make up the mycelium.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypha - any of the threadlike filaments forming the mycelium of a fungus
conidiophore - a specialized fungal hypha that produces conidia
mycelium - the vegetative part of a fungus consisting of a mass of branching threadlike hyphae
rhizomorph - a dense mass of hyphae forming a root-like structure characteristic of many fungi
fibril, filament, strand - a very slender natural or synthetic fiber
References in periodicals archive ?
The disease cycle begins with conidia contacting and adhering to the integument of the host (Figure 1), followed by germination, appressorium production (Figure 2a) or without appressorium formation (Figure 2b), penetration (Figure 3a,b), development in the hemocoel with the dimorphic (yeast-like forms) stage represented by the formation of short, thick and septated hyphal bodies, mostly with one or more septation (Figure 3a), to mycelial exteriorisation (Figure 4a,b) and as shown (Figure 6 a,b) on pupae mycelial exteriorisation and conidiogenesis on the carcass.
Microscopically, in tangential section, a hyphal zonation (pilosa, compact, superior subcompact, intermedia laxa, medulla, inferior subcompact and hymenial) is observed.
Histopathologic examination showed that the mucous membrane of the saccobronchus was thickened with hyphal proliferation, and the fungus was identified as Aspergillusfumigatus.
Most of the substances practitioners recommend help create an environment that hyphal yeast forms do not thrive in or that the body's own defenses do.
albicans PLD1 is involved in hyphal development in vitro and PLD1 deficient yeast are avirulent compared to wildtype in mouse models of candidiasis.
The chapters are organized into sections covering introductory issues; replication and expression of the genetic code; organelles; hyphal growth; metabolism; photobiology and circadian rhythms; nutrient, pH, and stress sensing; sexual development; asexual sporulation; interactions of fungi with plants or other fungi; and animal pathogens.
The culture plates were incubated at 30[degrees]C and observed daily up to 96 h for colony characteristics, such as surface topography (rough or smooth), formation of hyphal fringes at the periphery, and color.
AMF can potentially integrate the emerging seedlings in the introduced communities with the extensive hyphal networks to nourish them (van der Heijden, 2004) act as a symbiotic support system to overcome their recruitment limitation in the invaded habitats.
We would watch these beautiful fuzzy, or feathery, or furry hyphal tips grow out," she says.
Minimizing soil cultivation is the best way to host a robust mycorrhizal mob, because digging breaks up their hyphal networks.
Hyphal interactions between Trichoderma harzianum and Rhizoctonia solani: Ultrastructure and gold cytochemistry of the mycoparasitic process.
With the fall in blood pH, there is increased release of iron from transferrin that enhances hyphal growth (2).