hypnogogic state

Related to hypnogogic state: Hypnagogic hallucinations, Hypnagogic imagery

hypnogogic state

A state between waking and sleeping or vice versa, often characterized by hallucinatory images.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
I believe that, when I'm on the verge of fainting, the patch(es) of maze-or computer chip-like grid pattern that invade/s my inner mental imagery is in fact the abstract pixel board or canvas that all visualisation is built upon, only visible in that hypnogogic state. When it/they totally overtake that vision field I faint, but the earlier patches warn me in time to move to a spot where it's safe to faint without hitting something valuable or dangerous.
But Atsuko's lab is thrown into uproar when one of the four prototype DC-Minis goes missing and someone starts using it to invade Atsuko's colleagues' minds, planting a dream so powerful the victim falls into a permanent hypnogogic state in which he or she is still capable of walking around zombie-like and spouting nonsense.
Finally, even though Dali, who rested his chin upon a spoon in order to wake himself from a hypnogogic state (Mavromatis, 19 87), Edison, who claimed to hold two steel balls in his hand which woke him from his hypnogogic state (Mavromatis, 1987), and Freud, who used his dreams to develop a model of the mind (Freud, 1900/1976), all used their mental images in extraordinarily creative ways, the actual images themselves did not differ in extraordinary ways.
But it's more than that: it's a dreamy appearance, a far-off look, the "hypnogogic state" between waking and sleep that fascinated Edgar Allan Poe.
This usually involves all altered state of consciousness--any state that is not normal waking consciousness, and includes sleeping, dreaming, moments of pre-sleep (hypnogogic state), moments of post-sleep (hypnopompic state), meditation, and day-dreaming, (Tart, 1969).
Lewis-Williams depicts the spectrum of consciousness as a line, with alert problem-solving consciousness on the left, bifurcating halfway, the top branch indicating the intensified trajectory of trance states and the lower branch indicating the normal trajectory of hypnogogic states, dreaming and unconsciousness (2002: 125; 2004: 31).
The use of hypnosis or hypnogogic states in pain reduction is quite prolific.