tetany

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Related to hypomagnesemic tetany: grass tetany, milk tetany

tet·a·ny

 (tĕt′n-ē)
n. pl. tet·a·nies
An abnormal condition characterized by periodic painful muscular spasms and tremors, caused by faulty calcium metabolism and associated with diminished function of the parathyroid glands.

[From tetanus.]

tetany

(ˈtɛtənɪ)
n
(Pathology) pathol an abnormal increase in the excitability of nerves and muscles resulting in spasms of the arms and legs, caused by a deficiency of parathyroid secretion
[C19: from French tétanie. See tetanus]

tet•a•ny

(ˈtɛt n i)

n.
a state marked by severe, intermittent tonic contractions and muscular pain, due to abnormal calcium metabolism.
[1880–85; < New Latin tetania. See tetanus, -y3]

tetany

Muscle twitches, spasms, and convulsions resulting from a lack of calcium in the blood. It may be caused by a dysfunction in the parathyroid glands (hypoparathyroidism).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tetany - clinical neurological syndrome characterized by muscular twitching and cramps and (when severe) seizurestetany - clinical neurological syndrome characterized by muscular twitching and cramps and (when severe) seizures; associated with calcium deficiency (hypoparathyroidism) or vitamin D deficiency or alkalosis
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
Translations

tet·a·ny

n. tetania, afección neuromuscular que se manifiesta con espasmos intermitentes de los músculos voluntarios asociada con deficiencia paratiroidea y disminución del balance de calcio.
References in periodicals archive ?
ketosis, fat cow syndrome, milk fever, downer's cow syndrome, hypomagnesemic tetany, post parturient haemoglobinuria etc.
Grass tetany or hypomagnesemic tetany is characterized by low Mg concentrations in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid of cattle that results in reduced milk production of lactating females, reduced weight gain of feeders on pasture, or, in acute cases, convulsions, coma, and death of affected animals (NRC, 1996).
Spring blizzards, such as 27 to 29 May 1982 and 11 May 1999, were followed by reports of hypomagnesemic tetany to local veterinarian clinics or provincial extension staff (P.