amenorrhea

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Related to hypothalamic amenorrhea: hypothalamus, Hypothalamic dysfunction

a·men·or·rhe·a

 (ā-mĕn′ə-rē′ə)
n.
Abnormal suppression or absence of menstruation.

[a- + Greek mēn, month; see mē- in Indo-European roots + -rrhea.]

a·men′or·rhe′ic, a·men′or·rhe′al adj.

a•men•or•rhe•a

(eɪˌmɛn əˈri ə, əˌmɛn-)

n.
absence of the menses.
[1795–1805]
a•men`or•rhe′al, a•men`or•rhe′ic, adj.

amenorrhea

The abnormal absence of menstruation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amenorrhea - absence or suppression of normal menstrual flow
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
primary amenorrhea - delay of menarche beyond age 18
secondary amenorrhea - cessation of menstruation in a woman who had previously menstruated
Translations

a·men·or·rhe·a

n. amenorrea, ausencia del período menstrual.

amenorrhea

n amenorrea
References in periodicals archive ?
Women for whom the STRAW-10 criteria are not applicable include those with polycystic ovarian syndrome or hypothalamic amenorrhea.
All women with hypothalamic amenorrhea were 90%-110% of ideal body weight; amenorrheic for at least 3 months; had normal FSH, prolactin, testosterone, and free testosterone levels; an LH-to-FSH ratio of less than 2.
Head imaging is indicated when no clear etiology of hypothalamic amenorrhea is obvious to rule out pituitary or hypothalamic disease.
Women were categorized clinically as normal (either obese or nonobese), or as having hyperprolactinemia, hypothalamic amenorrhea, or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) (again, either obese or nonobese).
One study compared melatonin levels of seven women with hypothalamic amenorrhea with controls and discovered that the duration of elevated nocturnal melatonin secretion in the women with hypothalamic amenorrhea was considerably higher than that of normal controls (Berga, Mortol, & Yen, 1988).
Called functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA), the condition affects some 5 percent of women in their reproductive years.