syncope

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syn·co·pe

 (sĭng′kə-pē, sĭn′-)
n.
1. Grammar The shortening of a word by omission of a sound, letter, or syllable from the middle of the word; for example, bos'n for boatswain.
2. Medicine A brief loss of consciousness caused by inadequate blood flow to the brain.

[Middle English sincopis, from sincopene, from Late Latin syncopēn, accusative of syncopē, from Greek sunkopē, from sunkoptein, to cut short : sun-, syn- + koptein, to strike.]

syn′co·pal (sĭng′kə-pəl, sĭn′-), syn·cop′ic (sĭn-kŏp′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

syncope

(ˈsɪŋkəpɪ)
n
1. (Pathology) pathol a technical word for a faint
2. (Linguistics) the omission of one or more sounds or letters from the middle of a word
[C16: from Late Latin syncopa, from Greek sunkopē a cutting off, from syn- + koptein to cut]
syncopic, ˈsyncopal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

syn•co•pe

(ˈsɪŋ kəˌpi, ˈsɪn-)

n.
1. the shortening of a word by omitting one or more sounds from the middle, as in the reduction of never to ne'er.
2. brief loss of consciousness associated with an inadequate flow of oxygenated blood to the brain.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin syncopē < Greek synkopḗ cutting up =syn- syn- + kopḗ act of cutting, <kóptein to cut]
syn•cop•ic (sɪnˈkɒp ɪk) syn′co•pal, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.syncope - a spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brainsyncope - a spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brain
loss of consciousness - the occurrence of a loss of the ability to perceive and respond
2.syncope - (phonology) the loss of sounds from within a word (as in `fo'c'sle' for `forecastle')
phonemics, phonology - the study of the sound system of a given language and the analysis and classification of its phonemes
articulation - the aspect of pronunciation that involves bringing articulatory organs together so as to shape the sounds of speech
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

syncope

noun
Pathology. A temporary loss of consciousness:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
mdlobasynkopa

syncope

[ˈsɪŋkəpɪ] N
1. (Med) → síncope m
2. (Ling, Mus) → síncopa f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

syncope

n (Ling, Med) → Synkope f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

syn·co·pe

n. síncope, desmayo o pérdida temporal del conocimiento;
anginal ______ anginoso;
deglutition ______ de deglución;
cardiac ______ cardíaco;
convulsive ______ convulsivo;
hysterical ______ histérico;
laryngeal ______ laríngeo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

syncope

n síncope m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The masterful doctor who recognizes the deceitful symptoms of hysterical syncope and possesses the skill--again helped by musical therapy like Paulina's--to urge the hysteric back to life firmly fixes Pericles as a pagan "medical romance," its imagery at the very least competing for primacy with Christian resurrection symbolism.
Thus, Pericles and The Winter's Tale offer us women in hysterical syncopes who are returned to life, literally and then figuratively, and undergo trials of repurification, when Hero's revivification in Much Ado need be only symbolically invoked; furthermore, Othello and The Duchess of Malfi leave unresolved the questions about female sexual errancy, promoting this suspicious uncertainty through the device of revivification after strangulation or suffocation.