iatrochemistry


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iatrochemistry

(aɪˌætrəʊˈkɛmɪstrɪ)
n
(Chemistry) chem the discipline of treating disease or illness using chemical solutions

iatrochemistry

1. originally, alchemy devoted to medicinal purposes, especially the alchemy of the period 1525-1660, influenced by the theories of Paracelsus.
2. currently, chemistry for healing purposes. — iatrochemist, n.
See also: Alchemy
References in periodicals archive ?
Fernandez-Medina demonstrates that Cabriada contributes the most significant treatises of vital force of the late seventeenth century, one that moves away from Galenic humoralism and takes up new ideas from iatrochemistry and mechanic-vitalist discoveries from abroad.
The sixty colloquies forming part of Orta's book present a medical view moving away from Galenism and Aristotelianism, and based upon modern botany and iatrochemistry. Furthermore, the economical context in which he lived exerted a deep influence on his conception.
2) The iatrochemists, seeing life as chemical process, such as Jan Baptist van Helmont (1579-1644) of Brussels, Franciscus Sylvius (1614-1672) of Leiden (founder of iatrochemistry), or Thomas Willis (1621-1675) of Oxford and London.
Objective: The project will examine the histories of yoga, ayurveda and rasashastra (Indian alchemy and iatrochemistry) from the tenth century to the present, focussing on the disciplines~ health, rejuvenation and longevity practices.
on the science of letters and talismans, on afflictions from the jinn, and on pharmacology and iatrochemistry, the chapter charts in detail the Greek, prophetic, and non-Muslim theories and practices on which Sufi healers drew.
They generally agree that there was probably less discord in medical practice than in medical theory, and the new sciences of anatomy and physiology, iatrochemistry and iatromechanial theory competed with medieval and early modern Galenism and the remnants of the Aristotelian intellectual edifice and its postulate of the organic integrity of body and soul.
Boyle and Newton drew on a well-developed experimental tradition and corpuscular matter theory derived from thirteenth-century Aristotelian alchemy and fused with Paracelsian spagyrical methods: it was seventeenth-century alchemy and iatrochemistry that provided them with the materialist theoretical basis and quantitative experimental methods on which to develop a replacement for Aristotle's substantial forms, not the Cartesian clockwork mechanism and Gassendian atomism.