iconic

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i·con·ic

 (ī-kŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or having the character of an icon.
2. Symbolic, emblematic, or representative: a classroom scene that is iconic of what is wrong with the education system.
3. Having a conventional formulaic style. Used of certain memorial statues and busts.

i′co·nic′i·ty (ī′kə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

iconic

(aɪˈkɒnɪk) or

iconical

adj
1. relating to, resembling, or having the character of an icon
2. (Art Terms) (of memorial sculptures, esp those depicting athletes of ancient Greece) having a fixed conventional style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.iconic - relating to or having the characteristics on an icon
Translations

iconic

[aɪˈkɒnɪk] ADJ [image] → simbólico (Comput, Math) → icónico

iconic

[aɪˈkɒnɪk] adj [status, figure, image] → d'icône, emblématique
to achieve iconic status → s'élever au statut d'icône, devenir emblématique
The ads helped the brand to achieve iconic status → La publicité permit à la marque de s'élever au statut d'icône.

iconic

adj
(Ling, Comput, Psych) → ikonisch
(Art) portraitikonisch
(culturally) an iconic figureeine Ikone; to achieve iconic statuszur Ikone werden
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolf in the fourth part (Chapters 19-22) probes into the common yet little explored transmedial phenomena, particularly iconicity and metalepsis.
She discusses performance and iconicity, the historical context, medieval textual images, dharma relics in medieval Japan, and Buddhist reliquaries and somatic profusions.
As such, it is an image, albeit one made up of plain text." (22) This assertion accords with what Jeffrey Hamburger means by "the iconicity of script"--that is, "its instrumental and expressive aspects as a visual medium." Those who encounter such an elaborate text-as-image may be puzzled by it; others, dismissive of it.
The brand mark was also given a subtle refresh, moving to a more single-minded, solid background color, delivering iconicity and standout at shelf.
It is important to distinguish two broad conceptions of iconicity as a secular expression of "grace." The first rests on the attainment of a post hoc reputation based on a quantitative fact: this or that image, person, or object has been the subject of extensive media exposure and, over time, has become part of the experience of large numbers of people.
The increasing attempts to facilitate life with technological means in a digital culture (which allows technology with its positive contribution to enter our life and control it) can eventually lead to a loss of both iconicity and uniqueness of the person.
The iconicity of the passage is metrically enhanced by the fact that the violent interruption of her speech coincides with enjambment, the break of the line, which is indicated by Jonathan Bate's arrangement of the half-lines which has been adopted, together with the stage direction, in the above quotation.
Lacking the dimensional complexity and semiotic intensity of the portraits, these works, with their masonry-esque striations of dutifully inscribed yet somewhat arbitrary embellishments, failed to overcome or energize the cliche iconicity of their supporting form.
Moving away from the domain of commemorative, iconicity, monumentalization, and memorialization, the author uses Steve Biko's meditations as a discursive intervention to understand Black subjectivity.