iconoclast


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i·con·o·clast

 (ī-kŏn′ə-klăst′)
n.
1. One who attacks and seeks to overthrow traditional or popular ideas or institutions.
2. One who destroys sacred religious images.

[French iconoclaste, from Medieval Greek eikonoklastēs, smasher of religious images : eikono-, icono- + Greek -klastēs, breaker (from klān, klas-, to break).]

i·con′o·clas′tic adj.
i·con′o·clas′ti·cal·ly adv.
Word History: Among the Ten Commandments found in the Bible is the following: "Thou shalt not make unto thee a graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth." In the 8th and 9th centuries, these words inspired some Christians of the Byzantine Empire to destroy religious images such as paintings and sculptures of Jesus, the Virgin Mary, and the saints. The Medieval Greek word for a person who destroyed such images was eikonoklastēs, formed from the elements eikōn, "image, likeness," and -klastēs, "breaker," and the Medieval Greek word is the source of the English word iconoclast. In addition to simply destroying many paintings and sculptures, the Medieval Greek iconoclasts also sought to have them barred from display and veneration. In English, the word iconoclast was originally used in reference to these Byzantine iconoclasts. During the Protestant Reformation, however, images in churches were again felt to be idolatrous and were once more banned and destroyed, and the word iconoclast came to be used of the Protestant opponents of graven images, too. In the 19th century, iconoclast took on the secular sense that it has today.

iconoclast

(aɪˈkɒnəˌklæst)
n
1. a person who attacks established or traditional concepts, principles, laws, etc
2.
a. a destroyer of religious images or sacred objects
b. an adherent of the heretical movement within the Greek Orthodox Church from 725 to 842 ad, which aimed at the destruction of icons and religious images
[C16: from Late Latin iconoclastes, from Late Greek eikonoklastes, from eikōn icon + klastēs breaker]
iˌconoˈclastic adj
iˌconoˈclastically adv

i•con•o•clast

(aɪˈkɒn əˌklæst)

n.
1. a person who attacks cherished beliefs or traditional institutions as being based on error or superstition.
2. a breaker or destroyer of images, esp. those set up for religious veneration.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin īconoclastēs < Medieval Greek eikonoklástēs= Greek eikono- icono- + -klastēs breaker, agentive derivative of klân to break]
i•con`o•clas′tic, adj.
i•con`o•clas′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.iconoclast - a destroyer of images used in religious worshipiconoclast - a destroyer of images used in religious worship
ruiner, uprooter, waster, destroyer, undoer - a person who destroys or ruins or lays waste to; "a destroyer of the environment"; "jealousy was his undoer"; "uprooters of gravestones"
2.iconoclast - someone who attacks cherished ideas or traditional institutions
aggressor, assailant, assaulter, attacker - someone who attacks

iconoclast

noun rebel, radical, dissident, heretic He was an iconoclast who refused to be bound by tradition.
Translations

iconoclast

[aɪˈkɒnəklæst] Niconoclasta mf

iconoclast

[aɪˈkɒnəklæst] niconoclaste mf

iconoclast

n (lit)Bilderstürmer m, → Ikonoklast m (liter); (fig)Bilderstürmer(in) m(f)

iconoclast

[aɪˈkɒnəklæst] n (frm) → iconoclasta m/f
References in classic literature ?
They sneer at your most inoffensive suggestions; they laugh unfeelingly at your treasured dreams of foreign lands; they brand the statements of your traveled aunts and uncles as the stupidest absurdities; they deride your most trusted authors and demolish the fair images they have set up for your willing worship with the pitiless ferocity of the fanatic iconoclast! But still I love the Old Travelers.
Considering how many hundreds of statues of the great Emperor must exist in London, it is too much to suppose such a coincidence as that a promiscuous iconoclast should chance to begin upon three specimens of the same bust."
He will be as indefatigable in defending our historical edifices as our iconoclasts of the schools and academies are eager in attacking them; for it is a grievous thing to see into what hands the architecture of the Middle Ages has fallen, and in what a manner the botchers of plaster of the present day treat the ruin of this grand art, it is even a shame for us intelligent men who see them at work and content ourselves with hooting them.
While working on his 2015 Law, Power, and Imperial Ideology in the Iconoclast Era, c.680-850, Humphreys realized that a new translation of then Byzantine legal texts he was working with was necessary, and set about creating one.
Gelernter is a brilliant iconoclast. He foresaw the World Wide Web and social media in his 1991 book Mirror Worlds, and he has written books about a wide range of subjects, including Judaism and the 1939 World's Fair.
In Jacob Neusner: An American Jewish Iconoclast, Aaron Hughes has written an engaging and informative biography on the life and career of Jacob Neusner (late Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of the History and Theology of Judaism; Senior Fellow, Institute of Advanced Theology, Bard College).
It was earlier reported that Balan will play Das, a true iconoclast known for her controversial and bold work and went on to embrace Islam some time before her death in 2009.
Murphy's Law is a reality check for optimists like your Iconoclast. He just bought his wife a new car.
Rock legend Marianne Lane (Academy Award[R] winner Tilda Swinton) is recuperating on the volcanic island of Pantelleria with her partner Paul (Matthias Schoenaerts) when iconoclast record producer and old flame Harry (Academy Award[R] nominee Ralph Fiennes) unexpectedly arrives with his daughter Penelope (Dakota Johnson) and interrupts their holiday, bringing with him an A-bomb blast of nostalgia from which there can be no rescue.
Although stripped of the film's unearthly scifi effects, the artsy stage piece has been directed (between Broadway revivals of Arthur Miller plays "A View From the Bridge" and "The Crucible") by the iconoclast Belgian director Ivo van Hove, which guarantees a more theatrical kind of weirdness.
This summary of Leslie Brubaker and John Haldon's Byzantium in the Iconoclast Era has the same primary purpose as that longer book: to show that what Byzantine sources and most modern scholars have said about iconoclasm is false.
The author having been an iconoclast since his youth, the book is as much a story about a back-to-the-land Vermont farmer coming to collaborate with government as the story of the bats for whose benefit the forested land was managed.