iconoclastic


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Related to iconoclastic: Iconoclastic controversy

i·con·o·clast

 (ī-kŏn′ə-klăst′)
n.
1. One who attacks and seeks to overthrow traditional or popular ideas or institutions.
2. One who destroys sacred religious images.

[French iconoclaste, from Medieval Greek eikonoklastēs, smasher of religious images : eikono-, icono- + Greek -klastēs, breaker (from klān, klas-, to break).]

i·con′o·clas′tic adj.
i·con′o·clas′ti·cal·ly adv.
Word History: Among the Ten Commandments found in the Bible is the following: "Thou shalt not make unto thee a graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth." In the 8th and 9th centuries, these words inspired some Christians of the Byzantine Empire to destroy religious images such as paintings and sculptures of Jesus, the Virgin Mary, and the saints. The Medieval Greek word for a person who destroyed such images was eikonoklastēs, formed from the elements eikōn, "image, likeness," and -klastēs, "breaker," and the Medieval Greek word is the source of the English word iconoclast. In addition to simply destroying many paintings and sculptures, the Medieval Greek iconoclasts also sought to have them barred from display and veneration. In English, the word iconoclast was originally used in reference to these Byzantine iconoclasts. During the Protestant Reformation, however, images in churches were again felt to be idolatrous and were once more banned and destroyed, and the word iconoclast came to be used of the Protestant opponents of graven images, too. In the 19th century, iconoclast took on the secular sense that it has today.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.iconoclastic - characterized by attack on established beliefs or institutions
unorthodox - breaking with convention or tradition; "an unorthodox lifestyle"
2.iconoclastic - destructive of images used in religious worship; said of religions, such as Islam, in which the representation of living things is prohibited
destructive - causing destruction or much damage; "a policy that is destructive to the economy"; "destructive criticism"

iconoclastic

adjective subversive, radical, rebellious, questioning, innovative, irreverent, impious, dissentient, denunciatory His iconoclastic tendencies can get him into trouble.
Translations

iconoclastic

[aɪˌkɒnəˈklæstɪk] ADJiconoclasta

iconoclastic

[aɪˌkɒnəˈklæstɪk] adj [person, ideas] → iconoclaste

iconoclastic

adj (fig)bilderstürmerisch

iconoclastic

[aɪˌkɒnəˈklæstɪk] (frm) adj (opinions) → iconoclastico/a, iconoclasta; (person) → iconoclasta
References in classic literature ?
"I think I am nearer the truth," she replied, "when I stand by the established, than you are, raging around like an iconoclastic South Sea Islander."
Sir Charles, feeling that such views bore adversely on him, and were somehow iconoclastic and low-lived, was about to make a peevish retort, when Erskine forestalled him by asking Trefusis what idea he had formed of the future of the arts.
In 726 Emperor Leo III issued an edict against the veneration of images and icons which started the Iconoclastic Controversy or Image Breaking.
More than two dozen ballet and modern companies will dance the iconoclastic choreographer's work in their seasons.
HYDERABAD -- Speakers at a programme paid homage to well-known lawyer and human rights activist Asma Jahangir describing her personality as iconoclastic, towering and versatile.
A gallery dedicated to Ernie Blake, the visionary founder of the valley, ensures that the character of this beloved ski resort remains true to iconoclastic form.
The exhibition, entitled Iconoclastic Controversies: a Visual Sociology of Statues and Commemoration Sites in the southern part of Cyprus by Professor Nicos Carpenter offers a visual sociology on the Cyprus Problem.
While iconoclasm is well documented in the West, most notably among Byzantines and Protestants, very little work has been done in surveying, much less analyzing, iconoclastic acts throughout East Asia.
Brubaker is correct that the Byzantines, while often referring to "iconoclasts" (eikonoklastai, "icon-smashers"), used a word for the iconoclastic movement (eikonomachia, "fighting against icons") that is more likely "iconomachy" than "iconoclasm" (3-4).
Zappa Plays Zappa @ St David's Hall, Cardiff (November 13)[bar] ONE of the most prolific, iconoclastic and virtuoso rock musicians of the 20th century (and that still really isn't doing him sufficient justice), Frank Zappa would be a hard act for any one to follow.
She asserts that for Luther and other Protestant reformers, clerical marriage was "iconoclastic" (145, 183) in that it helped to smash not only papal authority and its unrealistic demands, but also false notions of ordained clergy as set apart and sacred, and notions of a works righteousness that would presume to earn merit before God through ascetical renunciation of sexual activity.
Symbol & icon; Dionysius the Areopagite and the iconoclastic crisis.