identity theory


Also found in: Wikipedia.

identity theory

n
(Philosophy) philosophy a form of materialism which holds mental states to be identical with certain states of the brain and so to have no separate existence, but regards this identity as contingent so that mentalistic and physicalistic language are not held to be synonymous. See also anomalous monism, materialism2
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, by employing social identity theory, self-categorization theory, and social projection theory, we aimed to draw a clear distinction between workgroup and organizational identifications in the following three ways: cognitive mechanisms, motivational bases, and associated outcomes.
Based on social identity theory, this study investigates the value of selfies among young adults--some of the most frequent selfie sharers.
In the next section we address moral identity theory and its position in the dialogue between ethics and psychology.
The psychological functioning of anonymity during online interactions--social identity theory and sense of perceived psychological safety
A between-subjects experiment grounded in social identity theory was conducted with Chinese-American and Chinese consumers.
Social identity theory (SIT) also stated the same that, employees feel themselves identified with those organizations that are involved in corporate social responsibility and it ultimately contribute towards enhancing their attitudes.
Among their topics are accelerometers as a methodological tool in group processes research, identity theory paradigm integration: assessing the role of prominence and salience in the verification and self-esteem relationship, understanding white Americans' perceptions of "reverse" discrimination: an application of a new theory of status dissonance, and when people feel responsible for other people's behavior and attitudes.
The concepts of social identity theory and self-categorization theory provide an important foundation for understanding sport team identification.
Affective partisanship scholars generally ground their analyses in something called "social identity theory." There are many variants of this, but they have in common the contrast between in-group and out-group.
The mistaken identity theory had been posed by several commentators as a reasonable way to square Ford's vivid memory with Kavanaugh's categorical denial.
Constructivism, especially state identity theory explained by Alexander Wendt and Peter Katzenstein, has become far from the almost particularly rationalist mainstream of international relations theory.
Social identity theory provides the framework to make sense of identity development through various populations.