idiograph

idiograph

(ˈɪdɪəʊˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
a trademark
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

idiograph

1. a signature or mark characteristic of or peculiar to a particular person, organization, etc.
2. a logotype or trademark.
See also: Representation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(16) The filial piety ([phrase omitted]) is a compound idiograph of the old ([phrase omitted])' and 'son ([phrase omitted]),' describing a child is holding up his parents.
Having introduced terminology to describe the parts of signs and their orientation, Stratford is able to explain how the graphs differ and which characteristics make them diagnostic idiographs that can point to the scribe's identity.
To be fair, Vita seems to be aware of the relevance of diagnostic idiographs and from several references one gathers the impression that these are for him especially the signs A, NA, EN, LUGAL, GIR, and MES.
Let me take a detour and look at how the case for handwriting is made even stronger in cultures that use idiographs or individual characters for each word, as in Chinese.
And the idiographs were doubly wrong to think, despite the abuses of "Orientalism," that real knowledge of particular places could not be produced by the application of theories and methods developed in other contexts and in other languages.