idiolect


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id·i·o·lect

 (ĭd′ē-ə-lĕkt′)
n.
The speech of an individual, considered as a linguistic pattern unique among speakers of his or her language or dialect.


id′i·o·lec′tal, id′i·o·lec′tic adj.

idiolect

(ˈɪdɪəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) the variety or form of a language used by an individual
ˌidioˈlectal, ˌidioˈlectic adj

id•i•o•lect

(ˈɪd i əˌlɛkt)

n.
a person's individual speech pattern.
[1945–50; idio- + -lect, as in dialect]
id`i•o•lec′tal, adj.

idiolect

a person’s individual speech habits.
See also: Linguistics

idiolect

The variety of a language that is used by an individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiolect - the language or speech of one individual at a particular period in life
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
Translations

idiolect

[ˈɪdɪəʊlekt] Nidiolecto m

idiolect

nIdiolekt m
References in periodicals archive ?
It would take you too far outside your own idiolect, outside your own register.
Now, though I agree with the grammaticality judgements of (21), both (20a) and (20b) are perfectly grammatical in my own idiolect, and also in the idiolect of the Spanish speakers that I have consulted.
Moreover, he notes that factors like idiolect and genre
It is widely accepted that social facts about an individual's linguistic community can affect both the reference of his words and the concepts (or idiolect meanings) those words express.
Often, PNL get so deep that they're using idiolect that's hard even for native French speakers to understand--so in a sense, it's no big deal if the rest of us don't get it, either.
In 2013-2014, I conducted a pilot phonetic study on reduced voiceless vowels in one idiolect of Southern Lower Luga Ingrian and one idiolect of Siberian Ingrian/Finnish.
In order to do so, I will approach Margaret's epistolary language as evidence for a written idiolect in specific pragmatic contexts.
These complexes of instructions for articulation, perception and thought are linguistic expressions of a given person's psychological idiolect.
He also comments on the fact that, nowadays, thanks to the possibility of using ever larger corpora (Google included), meaningful searches are possible in forensic authorship inquiries, thus helping scholars to "understand the extent to which idiolect may play a role in authorship identification" (97).
He instructed the company to form a circle around him, and then cawed in his rumbling thunder idiolect, "Leeson to muddah.
I write 'VOC language' because the kind of language in the VOC translations that I studied, Malay versions, is coloured by interference from the Dutch Bible and by the idiolect of the Dutch translators and I assume this is true for Siraya as well.
He was perhaps the first scholar to recognise and give full critical attention to the subtlety and complexity of Burns's use of language, demolishing the grossly simplistic notion of a two-way opposition between 'Scots' and 'English' and recognising not only that each of those two broadly distinguished language forms has a wide range of internal variations but that the boundary between them is highly permeable: that is, that Burns's poetic idiolect was a brilliantly exploited presentation of the complex sociolinguistic situation of his place and time.