idiolect

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id·i·o·lect

 (ĭd′ē-ə-lĕkt′)
n.
The speech of an individual, considered as a linguistic pattern unique among speakers of his or her language or dialect.


id′i·o·lec′tal, id′i·o·lec′tic adj.

idiolect

(ˈɪdɪəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) the variety or form of a language used by an individual
ˌidioˈlectal, ˌidioˈlectic adj

id•i•o•lect

(ˈɪd i əˌlɛkt)

n.
a person's individual speech pattern.
[1945–50; idio- + -lect, as in dialect]
id`i•o•lec′tal, adj.

idiolect

a person’s individual speech habits.
See also: Linguistics

idiolect

The variety of a language that is used by an individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiolect - the language or speech of one individual at a particular period in life
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
Translations

idiolect

[ˈɪdɪəʊlekt] Nidiolecto m

idiolect

nIdiolekt m
References in periodicals archive ?
The idiolects (Golding) that Dickens invented serve to single characters out in the large cast of figures appearing in every novel.
She redefines idiolects as continually emergent collections of context specific probabilistic memories entrenched as a result of domain-general cognitive processes that create and consolidate linguistic experience.
A re-grouping of the Amarna letters from Canaan according to the individual scribes who wrote them has great potential for advancing the study of linguistic features of the letters since it may now begin with the analysis of individual scribal idiolects. Its results may further support Vita's identifications by discovering coherent usages in groups of tablets assigned to the same scribe.
For them, translation takes place between speakers' idiolects, which derive from their "background, upbringing, environment, and so forth" (Striphas, 2006, p.
The public languages grounding the work of prescriptive grammarians are fundamentally different from the idiolects grounding the work of scientific linguists.
(What are commonly referred to as verbal "micro-aggressions" are pervasive throughout Barbey's fiction.) Types of speech are classified according to modes and registers of language; thus Claude-Phalippou composes an inventory of linguistic particularities and tics, idiolects and dialects, regionalisms, malapropisms, colloquialisms, and archaisms.
The meaning of "bachelor," in many English idiolects, is identical to the meaning of "unmarried man." Likewise, to presume another stock example, water, the substance, is identical to H2O.
Continuing the thought of Karl Buhler, Eugenio Coseriu restructured Jakobson's scheme of linguistic functions and Catherine Kerbrat-Orecchioni reformulated Jakobson's notions and argued that the communication process "relies not on the existence of a code, but on two idiolects: the message is dualized" at least in terms of the signified (16).
Without these idiolects, and many, many more, he could never have revitalized the American novel and turned it into Bellow country.
Garrett Stewart positions Victorian practitioners of the dramatic monologue, especially, as the natural heirs of Wordsworth's turn, in the Preface to Lyrical Ballads (1800), away from hackneyed poetic "Diction." Isobel Armstrong writes about "Syntax" as both articulate and articulated linguistic energy through close readings of the "idiolects" perceptible in Tennyson's "Tears, Idle Tears" (1847), Robert Browning's "Two in the Campagna" (1855), Christina Rossetti's "Winter Rain" (1862), and Michael Field's "Ebbtide at Sundown" (1908).
Sardinia is in principle a linguistic continuum which, although containing identifiable sub-types, fulfills the definition of a classic language complex as presented by Hockett (1958: 323 ff) and elaborated by ten Hacken (2005: 254): 'An L-complex is a set of idiolects such that any pair of idiolects in the set is linked by a chain of mutually intelligible idiolects,' with the implication that as distance increases, ease of mutual intelligibility wanes.
It identifies spoken languages as idiolects, in line roughly with Chomskyan Ilanguages.