idiomaticity

Translations
idiomaattisuus

idiomaticity

nIdiomatik f; his language lacked idiomaticityer drückte sich nicht sehr idiomatisch aus
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, I was struck by the idiomaticity of their English - the result of watching (with subtitles) the same English-language television programmes that we do.
This commitment to "true" Hebrew strains against the evangelical universalism of Eliot or Thorowgood, and results in translations that favor Jewish idiomaticity over Christian doctrine.
Put another way, depending on how they are looked at, and crucially, who looks at them, the regularities and idiosyncrasies in question reveal themselves in different proportions: those interested in regularities predictably stress regularities and authors concerned with the idiomaticity of language focus their attention on why the constructions need to be learned.
They defined lexical bundles as "bundles of words that show a statistical tendency to co-occur" (1999: 989) and as "recurrent expressions, regardless of their idiomaticity, and regardless of their structural status" (1999: 990) (e.g.
Effect of frequency and idiomaticity on second language reading comprehension.
These verbs, similarly to those analyzed so far, relate primarily to activities and experiences from concrete domains of motion and movement and they form with the noun tat constructions that have a high degree of idiomaticity. In other words, in constructions with tat they convey very specific meanings such as 'to enjoy fully' (tadini cikarmak lit.
Research on idioms has highlighted the three main properties of such expressions cross-linguistically: idiomaticity, stability and lexicalization (see Fellbaum 2011, Moon 1998, and Cacciari 1993, among others, for English; Groza 2005, Hristea 1984, and others, for Romanian).
* Displays consistent facility in the use of language, demonstrating syntactic variety, appropriate word choice and idiomaticity, though it may have minor lexical or grammatical errors"
Preparing tutors, both multilingual and native English speakers, to be agents of successful exchanges is a daunting task, but it can be quite rewarding if this preparation is built upon a foundation informed by the kinds of approaches offered in chapter two, "Learning from Interactions-" Drawing upon concepts such as idiomaticity, native-speaker privilege, and emicity, Rafoth demonstrates how complex interactions can be handled effectively if tutors are not just aware of how these concepts are tied to tutor and student expectations but flexible in adapting them.