idyll

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idyll

narrative poem; carefree experience: Their affair was simply a romantic idyll.
Not to be confused with:
idle – not in use; unemployed; inactive: The lifeguard was idle during the winter months.
idol – object of worship; a person blindly adored: The rock star was an idol to many teenagers.

i·dyll

also i·dyl  (īd′l)
n.
1.
a. A short poem or prose piece depicting a rural or pastoral scene, usually in idealized terms.
b. A narrative poem treating an epic or romantic theme.
2. A scene or event of a simple and tranquil nature.
3.
a. A carefree episode or experience: a summer idyll on the coast of France.
b. A romantic interlude.

[Latin īdyllium, from Greek eidullion, diminutive of eidos, form, figure; see weid- in Indo-European roots.]

idyll

(ˈɪdɪl) or

idyl

n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a poem or prose work describing an idealized rural life, pastoral scenes, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any simple narrative or descriptive piece in poetry or prose
3. a charming or picturesque scene or event
4. (Classical Music) a piece of music with a calm or pastoral character
[C17: from Latin īdyllium, from Greek eidullion, from eidos shape, (literary) form]

i•dyll

or i•dyl

(ˈaɪd l)

n.
1. a poem or prose composition describing pastoral scenes or events or any charmingly simple episode or picturesque scene.
2. material suitable for such a work.
3. a long narrative poem on a major theme: Tennyson's Idylls of the King.
4. an episode or scene of idyllic charm.
5. a brief romantic affair.
[1595–1605; < Latin īdyllium < Greek eidýllion short pastoral poem]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idyll - an episode of such pastoral or romantic charm as to qualify as the subject of a poetic idyll
episode - a happening that is distinctive in a series of related events
2.idyll - a musical composition that evokes rural lifeidyll - a musical composition that evokes rural life
musical composition, opus, piece of music, composition, piece - a musical work that has been created; "the composition is written in four movements"
3.idyll - a short poem descriptive of rural or pastoral life
pastoral - a literary work idealizing the rural life (especially the life of shepherds)

idyll

noun heaven, ideal, paradise, Eden, Utopia, perfect place, Garden of Eden, Shangri-la, Happy Valley, seventh heaven, Erewhon This town was not the rural idyll she had imagined.
Translations
idylaselanka
idyl
idila

idyll

[ˈɪdɪl] Nidilio m

idyll

[ˈɪdəl] idyl (US) n
(= romance) → idylle f
Though they still talked a lot, Harry felt that their idyll was drawing to an end → Ils se parlaient toujours beaucoup mais Harry sentait bien que leur idylle touchait à sa fin.
(= idealized place) a rural idyll → une idylle bucolique

idyll

n
(Liter) → Idylle f
(fig)Idyll nt

idyll

[ˈɪdɪl] nidillio
References in classic literature ?
Browning's later work is, full of intellect, alive with excellent passages (in the first volume of the Dramatic Idyls [50] perhaps more powerful than in any earlier work); notwithstanding all that, we think the change here indicated matter of regret.
(She had advanced far enough to join him in ridiculing the Idyls of the King, but not to feel the beauty of Ulysses and the Lotus Eaters.) She was straightforward, loyal and brave; she had a sense of humour (chiefly proved by her laughing at HIS jokes); and he suspected, in the depths of her innocently-gazing soul, a glow of feeling that it would be a joy to waken.
But, as certain tenacities are stronger than others, Athos was forced to hear Planchet recite his idyls of felicity, translated into a language more chaste than that of Longus.
The pairing of the birds is an idyl, not tedious as our idyls are; a tempest is a rough ode, without falsehood or rant; a summer, with its harvest sown, reaped, and stored, is an epic song, subordinating how many admirably executed parts.
In summary catalogue may be named: lyrics, both delicate and stirring; ballads; romantic dreams and fancies; descriptive poems; sentimental reveries, and idyls; long narratives, in which he displays perfect narrative skill; delightfully realistic character-sketches, some of them in dialect; dramas; and meditative poems, long and short, on religious, ethical, and social questions.
"I think, scathed as you look, and charred and scorched, there must be a little sense of life in you yet, rising out of that adhesion at the faithful, honest roots: you will never have green leaves more-- never more see birds making nests and singing idyls in your boughs; the time of pleasure and love is over with you: but you are not desolate: each of you has a comrade to sympathise with him in his decay." As I looked up at them, the moon appeared momentarily in that part of the sky which filled their fissure; her disk was blood- red and half overcast; she seemed to throw on me one bewildered, dreary glance, and buried herself again instantly in the deep drift of cloud.
Their life in its own way was an idyl, and it managed to achieve a singular beauty.
May I relate the idyl of your tragic passion, dear Dubois, as an object lesson?"
He made a delicate idyl of it: the sunshine and the sea gave it passion and magic, and the stars added poetry, and the old vicarage garden was a fit and exquisite setting.
It is worth noting, just by way of conclusion, that despite modern scholarship's preference for Browning's nondramatic writings, it is for good reason that it is commonplace to view his oeuvre through the lens of his "dramatic imagination." (38) Of course, he authored plays such as Strafford and Pippa Passes, but also the various titles that he gave to his collections of poetry push in precisely this direction, Dramatic Lyrics, Dramatic Romances, Dramatis Personae, and Dramatic Idyls all blurring the usual distinction drawn between dramatic and nondramatic verse.
Simon White, for example, suggests a connection between Bloomfield and William Barnes and Barnes to Thomas Hardy, while John Lucas muses on the possibility of Tennyson having May-Day with the Muses at the back of his mind while composing his "English Idyls" (1832-42).