ill-natured

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ill-na·tured

(ĭl′nā′chərd)
adj.
1. Having a disagreeable, irritable, or malevolent disposition.
2. Spiteful; nasty: an ill-natured retort.

ill′-na′tured·ly adv.
ill′-na′tured·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ill-natured

adj
naturally unpleasant and mean
ˌill-ˈnaturedly adv
ˌill-ˈnaturedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ill′-na′tured



adj.
having or showing an unpleasant disposition.
[1625–35]
ill′-na′tured•ly, adv.
ill′-na′tured•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition
unpleasant - disagreeable to the senses, to the mind, or feelings ; "an unpleasant personality"; "unpleasant repercussions"; "unpleasant odors"
good-natured - having an easygoing and cheerful disposition; "too good-natured to resent a little criticism"; "the good-natured policeman on our block"; "the sounds of good-natured play"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ill-natured

[ˈɪlˈneɪtʃəd] ADJdesabrido, malhumorado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ill-natured

[ˌɪlˈneɪtʃəd] adjd'indole cattiva
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Her complexion was sallow; and her features small, without beauty, and naturally without expression; but a lucky contraction of the brow had rescued her countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill nature. She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people in general, she proportioned them to the number of her ideas; and of the few syllables that did escape her, not one fell to the share of Miss Dashwood, whom she eyed with the spirited determination of disliking her at all events.
I like to look at statues, however, and I like to look at pictures, also --even of monks looking up in sacred ecstacy, and monks looking down in meditation, and monks skirmishing for something to eat--and therefore I drop ill nature to thank the papal government for so jealously guarding and so industriously gathering up these things; and for permitting me, a stranger and not an entirely friendly one, to roam at will and unmolested among them, charging me nothing, and only requiring that I shall behave myself simply as well as I ought to behave in any other man's house.
And ugliness and discord and inharmonious motion are nearly allied to ill words and ill nature, as grace and harmony are the twin sisters of goodness and virtue and bear their likeness.