illiberality


Also found in: Thesaurus.

il·lib·er·al

 (ĭ-lĭb′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Narrow-minded; bigoted.
2. Archaic Ungenerous, mean, or stingy.
3. Archaic
a. Lacking education in the liberal arts.
b. Ill-bred; vulgar.

[Latin illīberālis : in-, not; see in-1 + līberālis, liberal; see liberal.]

il·lib′er·al·ism n.
il·lib′er·al′i·ty (-ə-răl′ĭ-tē), il·lib′er·al·ness n.
il·lib′er·al·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.illiberality - a disposition not to be liberal (generous) with money
stinginess - a lack of generosity; a general unwillingness to part with money
liberality, liberalness - the trait of being generous in behavior and temperament
References in classic literature ?
The illiberality of parents, in allowance towards their children, is an harmful error; makes them base; acquaints them with shifts; makes them sort with mean company; and makes them surfeit more when they come to plenty.
Let the calum- niators of the colored race despise themselves for their baseness and illiberality of spirit, and hence- forth cease to talk of the natural inferiority of those who require nothing but time and opportunity to attain to the highest point of human excellence.
If then we adhere to our original notion and bear in mind that our guardians, setting aside every other business, are to dedicate themselves wholly to the maintenance of freedom in the State, making this their craft, and engaging in no work which does not bear on this end, they ought not to practise or imitate anything else; if they imitate at all, they should imitate from youth upward only those characters which are suitable to their profession-- the courageous, temperate, holy, free, and the like; but they should not depict or be skilful at imitating any kind of illiberality or baseness, lest from imitation they should come to be what they imitate.
This new measure is conceptually similar to Child's illiberality and Mintzberg's hostility.
Almost every aspect of the liberal tradition has been criticized: it ignores alternative voices, oversimplifies cultural history and overlooks an unhappy heritage of profound illiberality. An alternative perspective begins with an entirely different foundation than the one Tocqueville and Hartz read into the early American experience.
What we get is injustice and illiberality. Take, for example, what may be the most active battle line in the contemporary morality crusades, the war on drugs.
In addition to implying that smaller families are easier to manage, the paragraph describes parenting as primarily concerned with the curbing the child's "affection." One way to do this is to avoid driving the child to "harmful error" through parental "illiberality." In the 1625 version of the essay, however, the paragraph concludes by urging the control and timely amputation of the individual inclinations of one's children:
177) and whose illiberality in following the occupation of a money-lender would naturally be described by himself as thrift (as at I.
But could it not be the very illiberality of the moviemakers and of the movie-going public that led to this excision?
He added: "But as I have said, I don't think it's true that I joined in that illiberality.
The assumption is that if the press does not speak out more openly, it is because it is confronted by an antediluvian statute book and the deep-seated illiberality of the Turkish establishment.
Bennet, though comical (and perhaps never so comical as when the news of Elizabeth's engagement to Darcy reduces her, for once, to cataleptic silence), is simultaneously, in the volatility of her temperament, in the illiberality of her mind, in the pushy materialism of her ambitions, a persistent shadow over her daughter's destiny.