illusory

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il·lu·so·ry

 (ĭ-lo͞o′sə-rē, -zə-rē)
adj.
Produced by, based on, or having the nature of an illusion; deceptive: an illusory belief that their finances would improve.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

illusory

(ɪˈluːsərɪ) or

illusive

adj
producing, produced by, or based on illusion; deceptive or unreal
ilˈlusorily, ilˈlusively adv
ilˈlusoriness, ilˈlusiveness n
Usage: Illusive is sometimes wrongly used where elusive is meant: they fought hard, but victory remained elusive (not illusive)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

il•lu•so•ry

(ɪˈlu sə ri, -zə-)

adj.
1. causing illusion; deceptive; misleading.
2. like an illusion; unreal.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin illūsōrius=illūd(ere) to mock, ridicule (see illusion) + -tōrius -tory1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.illusory - based on or having the nature of an illusion; "illusive hopes of finding a better job"; "Secret activities offer presidents the alluring but often illusory promise that they can achieve foreign policy goals without the bothersome debate and open decision that are staples of democracy"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

illusory

illusive
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

illusory

adjective
1. Of, relating to, or in the nature of an illusion; lacking reality:
2. Tending to lead one into error:
3. Tending to deceive; of the nature of an illusion:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
illusorius
iluzoriu

illusory

[ɪˈluːsəri] adjillusoire
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

illusory

a. ilusorio-a, rel. a la ilusión.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas in 221b Baker Street, the reader's mind is dazzled by superhuman grey matter, in Golden Age fiction, a tryst takes place between text and reader who engage, however illusorily on the readers' behalf, as if they were two board-game players in an evenly balanced contest.
On a net of gasoline expense basis, the TNV driver was illusorily making much more provided he was putting in his usual 12 or 24 hours of work a day just like before.
Thus, the love of money can be a source of unhappiness even if people illusorily believe in happiness-seeking via consumption.
To this end, the settings or "story themes" depicted in an advertisement convey messages that are positioned to appeal (sometimes in an illusorily fashion) to the culture and norms of the target audience (Alden, Steenkamp, & Batra, 1999, p.
For now, there continues to be an American majority, although smaller each passing day, which still considers itself, if illusorily, free; one far from being oppressed, or hopeless.
(15) (There are no reverse shots; Tom remains strictly the object of our look, and we are not invited to share his point of view.) The "primary identification" with the camera is here (more or less) detached from the syntactical operations of suture that place us illusorily within what Stephen Heath has called "narrative space." It is thus without passing through secondary identification that we enter the world of the film and that the screen here "overcomes our fixed distance," to return to Cavel's phrase.
Matthews, the novel's graphophone is a commodity object that recalls the "illusorily prosthetic qualities of novels themselves" by "simulat[ing] life and speech" to gratify the listener as he or she experiences life's losses and disappointments ("Machine Age" 90).
/ Of a low dishonest decade." Scared and angered by the dismal state of international relations, we retreat into an illusorily apolitical bubble, "Obsessing our private lives" even as "The unmentionable odour of death / Offends the September night." Seeking the roots of the current violence, the speaker turns first to "accurate scholarship," claiming that by examining the facts of both German culture after Luther and Hitler's own childhood at Linz, one might "Unearth the whole offence" and discover "What huge imago made / A psychopathic god." But the fault cannot be placed with any one man or nation, the speaker implies, as he turns his indictment to the "neutral air" he himself breathes, safe across the Atlantic in New York.