IR

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Ir

The symbol for iridium.

IR

abbr.
1. information retrieval
2. infrared
3. Sports injured reserve

ir

the internet domain name for
(Computer Science) Iran

Ir

the chemical symbol for
(Elements & Compounds) iridium

IR

abbreviation for
1. (General Physics) infrared
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly, in Britain) Inland Revenue
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Iran (international car registration)

IR

infrared.

Ir

Irish.

Ir


Chem. Symbol.
iridium.

ir-1

,
var. of in- 2 (by assimilation) before r: irradiate.

ir-2

,
var. of in- 3 (by assimilation) before r: irreducible.

Ir.

Ireland.

Ir

The symbol for iridium.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.IR - a heavy brittle metallic element of the platinum groupIr - a heavy brittle metallic element of the platinum group; used in alloys; occurs in natural alloys with platinum or osmium
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
2.IR - a board of the British government that administers and collects major direct taxes
administrative body, administrative unit - a unit with administrative responsibilities
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
References in periodicals archive ?
Prone S-VABs are performed with the patient lying on the biopsy table with the breast inserted into an opening in the table and compressed between the image receptor and compression plate.
Gantry is fixed with x-ray source and image receptor. The axial cut images of the patient's abdomen are obtained which traces the whole urinary tract system.22
Image receptor positioning errors (either too far forwards or backwards) were the most common causes of retakes overall.
After the sweep, the x-ray tube returns to its starting position perpendicular to the image receptor and obtains a conventional 2D image.
The third edition of this pocket guide to positioning patients for X-rays and other imaging removes the cassette icons with associated divisions used for multiple images on a single image receptor, which are no longer feasible with digital imagining.
It is important to note that the exposure area of the Rinn[R] universal device complies with the NCRP stipulation that rectangular collimated beams should not exceed the dimension of the image receptor by more than two percent of the source-to-image-receptor distance (SID) and has been measured as one percent of the SID.
The X-rays then generally pass through some medium before reaching the image receptor. The image that they produce depends on the medium that they have travelled through.
The third edition also includes new chapters on digital image receptor systems and bone densitometry.
An 8 x 10-inch or a 10 x 12-inch image receptor can be used.
But the image receptor (whether film or a CCD chip) quickly becomes 100 percent, or "fully," exposed; additional light beyond that is lost to overexposure.