imbibe

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im·bibe

 (ĭm-bīb′)
v. im·bibed, im·bib·ing, im·bibes
v.tr.
1. To drink.
2. To absorb or take in as if by drinking: "The whole body ... imbibes delight through every pore" (Henry David Thoreau).
3. To receive and absorb into the mind: "Gladstone had ... imbibed a strong prejudice against Americans" (Philip Magnus).
4. Obsolete To permeate; saturate.
v.intr.
To drink alcoholic beverages.

[Middle English embiben, to soak up, saturate, from Latin imbibere, to drink in, imbibe : in-, in; see in-2 + bibere, to drink; see pō(i)- in Indo-European roots.]

im·bib′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

imbibe

(ɪmˈbaɪb)
vb
1. to drink (esp alcoholic drinks)
2. literary to take in or assimilate (ideas, facts, etc): to imbibe the spirit of the Renaissance.
3. (tr) to take in as if by drinking: to imbibe fresh air.
4. to absorb or cause to absorb liquid or moisture; assimilate or saturate
[C14: from Latin imbibere, from bibere to drink]
imˈbiber n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•bibe

(ɪmˈbaɪb)

v. -bibed, -bib•ing. v.t.
1. to consume (liquids) by drinking; drink.
2. to absorb or soak up: Plants imbibe light from the sun.
3. to receive into the mind: to imbibe a sermon.
v.i.
4. to drink, esp. alcoholic beverages.
5. to absorb liquid or moisture.
[1350–1400; Middle English enbiben < Middle French embiber < Latin imbibere to drink in =im- im-1 + bibere to drink]
im•bib′er, n.
syn: See drink.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

imbibe


Past participle: imbibed
Gerund: imbibing

Imperative
imbibe
imbibe
Present
I imbibe
you imbibe
he/she/it imbibes
we imbibe
you imbibe
they imbibe
Preterite
I imbibed
you imbibed
he/she/it imbibed
we imbibed
you imbibed
they imbibed
Present Continuous
I am imbibing
you are imbibing
he/she/it is imbibing
we are imbibing
you are imbibing
they are imbibing
Present Perfect
I have imbibed
you have imbibed
he/she/it has imbibed
we have imbibed
you have imbibed
they have imbibed
Past Continuous
I was imbibing
you were imbibing
he/she/it was imbibing
we were imbibing
you were imbibing
they were imbibing
Past Perfect
I had imbibed
you had imbibed
he/she/it had imbibed
we had imbibed
you had imbibed
they had imbibed
Future
I will imbibe
you will imbibe
he/she/it will imbibe
we will imbibe
you will imbibe
they will imbibe
Future Perfect
I will have imbibed
you will have imbibed
he/she/it will have imbibed
we will have imbibed
you will have imbibed
they will have imbibed
Future Continuous
I will be imbibing
you will be imbibing
he/she/it will be imbibing
we will be imbibing
you will be imbibing
they will be imbibing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imbibing
you have been imbibing
he/she/it has been imbibing
we have been imbibing
you have been imbibing
they have been imbibing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imbibing
you will have been imbibing
he/she/it will have been imbibing
we will have been imbibing
you will have been imbibing
they will have been imbibing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imbibing
you had been imbibing
he/she/it had been imbibing
we had been imbibing
you had been imbibing
they had been imbibing
Conditional
I would imbibe
you would imbibe
he/she/it would imbibe
we would imbibe
you would imbibe
they would imbibe
Past Conditional
I would have imbibed
you would have imbibed
he/she/it would have imbibed
we would have imbibed
you would have imbibed
they would have imbibed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.imbibe - take in, also metaphoricallyimbibe - take in, also metaphorically; "The sponge absorbs water well"; "She drew strength from the minister's words"
mop, mop up, wipe up - to wash or wipe with or as if with a mop; "Mop the hallway now"; "He mopped her forehead with a towel"
blot - dry (ink) with blotting paper
sponge up - absorb as if with a sponge; "sponge up the spilled milk on the counter"
2.imbibe - take (gas, light or heat) into a solutionimbibe - take (gas, light or heat) into a solution
absorb - become imbued; "The liquids, light, and gases absorb"
3.imbibe - take in liquids; "The patient must drink several liters each day"; "The children like to drink soda"
ingest, consume, have, take in, take - serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
swill down, swill - drink large quantities of (liquid, especially alcoholic drink)
suck - draw into the mouth by creating a practical vacuum in the mouth; "suck the poison from the place where the snake bit"; "suck on a straw"; "the baby sucked on the mother's breast"
guggle, gurgle - drink from a flask with a gurgling sound
sip - drink in sips; "She was sipping her tea"
guzzle - drink greedily or as if with great thirst; "The boys guzzled the cheap vodka"
lap up, lick, lap - take up with the tongue; "The cat lapped up the milk"; "the cub licked the milk from its mother's breast"
drain the cup, drink up - drink to the last drop; "drink up--there's more wine coming"
gulp, quaff, swig - to swallow hurriedly or greedily or in one draught; "The men gulped down their beers"
belt down, bolt down, down, drink down, pour down, toss off, pop, kill - drink down entirely; "He downed three martinis before dinner"; "She killed a bottle of brandy that night"; "They popped a few beer after work"
4.imbibe - receive into the mind and retain; "Imbibe ethical principles"
assimilate, ingest, absorb, take in - take up mentally; "he absorbed the knowledge or beliefs of his tribe"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

imbibe

verb (Formal)
1. drink, consume, knock back (informal), neck (slang), sink (informal), swallow, suck, hoover (informal), swig (informal), quaff They were used to imbibing enormous quantities of alcohol.
2. absorb, receive, take in, gain, gather, acquire, assimilate, ingest He'd imbibed a set of mystical beliefs from the cradle.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

imbibe

verb
1. To take into the mouth and swallow (a liquid):
Informal: swig, toss down (or off).
Slang: belt.
2. To take alcoholic liquor, especially excessively or habitually:
Informal: nip, soak.
Slang: booze, lush, tank up.
Idioms: bend the elbow, hit the bottle .
3. To take in (moisture or liquid):
4. To take in and incorporate, especially mentally:
Informal: soak (up).
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
juoda

imbibe

[ɪmˈbaɪb]
A. VT (frm) (= drink) → beber (fig) [+ atmosphere] → empaparse de; [+ information] → imbuirse de (frm), empaparse de
B. VI (o.f., also hum) → beber
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

imbibe

vt
(form, hum)trinken, bechern (hum)
(fig) ideas, informationin sich (acc)aufnehmen
vi (hum: = drink) → viel trinken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

imbibe

[ɪmˈbaɪb] vt (frm) (also) (hum) (drink) → bere (fig) (absorb) → assorbire, assimilare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Yu, "Advances in studies of spontaneous imbibitions in porous media," Advances in Mechanics, vol.
Follow-up contrast enhanced MRI of the brain was performed and showed significant regression of the post-contrast signal intensity in the right cavernous sinus, previously extending basally towards the trigeminal cave and anteriorly towards the apex of the right orbit, with right-sided temporal-basal dural sheath imbibition and imbibitions along the clivus (Fig.
rotundifolia, so that it may be inferred that the average electrical conductivity 12.0[micro]S [cm.sup.-1] [g.sup.-1] of seeds established a percentage of vigor of approximately 25% of normal seedlings from 48:00 of imbibitions. The water immersion up to 24 hours is not enough to overcome dormancy and imbibe the seeds for times longer than 96 hours because causes decay and loss of the vigor.
Similarly, some dark soybean cultivars showed greater rate of imbibitions and fast germination (Chachalis, & Smith, 2000).
While the degree of imbibitions may vary, organisations today are responding to this trend like never before by empowering their workforce with smart devices to deliver work from their convenience.
The imbibitions rate of seeds was increased after one hydration-dehydration cycle (Figure 2).
However, dormant embryos reach about 100% germination when incubated with the phytohormone ethylene during imbibitions [6].
Theory and applications of imbibitions Phenomenon in recovery of oil, Journal of Petroleum Technology, 11(2) pp.
Seed priming is nowadays being extensively used to improve seed germination and seedling emergence in a wide range of crop species (Alvarado et al., 1987; Farahani et al., 2011a,b, c, d) and is basically a physiological process in which the seeds are presoaked before planting which, by itself, allows partial imbibitions though preventing the germination (Parera and Cantliffe, 1994).
In the first stage the surfactant imbibitions without aging is considered which is supposed to no wettability alteration.