imitative

(redirected from imitatively)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

im·i·ta·tive

 (ĭm′ĭ-tā′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of or involving imitation.
2. Not original; derivative.
3. Tending to imitate.
4. Onomatopoeic.

im′i·ta′tive·ly adv.
im′i·ta′tive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

imitative

(ˈɪmɪtətɪv)
adj
1. imitating or tending to imitate or copy
2. characterized by imitation
3. copying or reproducing the features of an original, esp in an inferior manner: imitative painting.
4. (Linguistics) another word for onomatopoeic
ˈimitatively adv
ˈimitativeness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•i•ta•tive

(ˈɪm ɪˌteɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. imitating; copying; given to imitation.
2. of, pertaining to, or characterized by imitation.
3. made in imitation of something; counterfeit.
4. onomatopoeic.
[1575–85; < Late Latin]
im′i•ta`tive•ly, adv.
im′i•ta`tive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imitative - marked by or given to imitation; "acting is an imitative art"; "man is an imitative being"
nonimitative - not marked by or given to imitation
2.imitative - (of words) formed in imitation of a natural sound; "onomatopoeic words are imitative of noises"; "it was independently developed in more than one place as an onomatopoetic term"- Harry Hoijer
3.imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"
artificial, unreal - contrived by art rather than nature; "artificial flowers"; "artificial flavoring"; "an artificial diamond"; "artificial fibers"; "artificial sweeteners"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"
false - not in accordance with the fact or reality or actuality; "gave false testimony under oath"; "false tales of bravery"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

imitative

adjective
1. copying, mimicking, derivative, copycat (informal), unoriginal, mimetic, echoic Babies of this age are highly imitative.
2. copied, put-on, mimicking, similar, mock, second-hand, simulated, pseudo (informal), parrot-like, unoriginal, plagiarized, mimetic, onomatopoeic This may lead to excitement and to imitative behaviour.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

imitative

adjective
1. Copying another in an inferior or obsequious way:
2. Imitating sounds:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُقَلِّد، مُحاكٍ
napodobující
efterlignende
hermi-
napodobňujúci

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] ADJimitativo
a style imitative of Joyce'sun estilo que imita el de Joyce
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adj
[person, animal] to be imitative → imiter ce que l'on fait
Babies of eight to twelve months are generally highly imitative → Les bébés de 8 à 12 mois imitent généralement tout ce que l'on fait.
[behaviour] → imitatif/ive
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

imitative

adjnachahmend, imitierend; children are naturally imitativeKinder machen von Natur aus alles nach
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adjimitativo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

imitate

(ˈimiteit) verb
to (try to) be, behave or look the same as (a person etc). Children imitate their friends rather than their parents; He could imitate the song of many different birds.
ˌimiˈtation noun
1. the act of imitating. Children learn how to speak by imitation.
2. a copy. an imitation of an ancient statue.
adjective
made to look like something else. imitation wood.
ˈimitative (-tətiv) adjective
ˈimitativeness noun
ˈimitator noun
a person who imitates.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, it is o nly when firms go beyond adopting best practices imitatively and create a well-integrated system that they can achieve a lasting competitive advantage and realize superior returns on their investment in organizational capital (p.
It contains a sequential pattern as a result of the paired imitation of the individual voices; Example 13b shows how the line is imitatively deployed between the upper and lower three notational layers.
Text painting begins at the level of expressing or "painting" particular words in music that would express them, sometimes imitatively (such as accompanying the word "down" with a descending passage).
(47) As Viadana suggests in his fifth rule in the Cento concerti, the keyboard player realizing a figured bass would double the vocal parts for works that begin imitatively. It seems that after the exposition of a work, however, all remaining sections--homophonic and polyphonic--may be accompanied chordally.
By taking on the protection of her sister, Cora is by implication possessing Alice, and imitatively rivalling, or even revenging herself upon the man who desires her.
The assumption behind "white" identity in a violently racialized society have their repercussion on poetry, on metaphor, on the civil life in which, for better or worse, oppositionally or imitatively, all art is rooted.
Campion himself, in the passage Ryding quotes, recommends "gracing no word, but that which is eminent, and emphaticall." The words Ryding shows him treating imitatively are often "eminent" in the root sense of that word, describing height or rising, and in any case, Campion could hardly avoid being influenced by so pervasive a technique as word-painting.
Truly penile or imitatively phallic, such a tricky performance of a human being reduced to an enlarged body part emerges as a reaction to the colonizer, rather than an action of the colonized.
The main section of the work begins (in minor!) imitatively, implying a fugue by passing around phrases, but, as it unfolds, the body of the work is essentially a development on the theme with each instrument acting independently, reminiscent of a fugue development, with interesting counterpoint.
This notion of the autonomy of the mind in poetic activity forms the basis of the Romantic theory of imagination: While 'fancy' depends upon a relationship between mind and nature, 'imagination' is defined by the power of its language precisely not to remain imitatively and repetitively true to sense perception.
Now in juxtaposition to recent historicist treatments of Milton, most notably Dennis Danielson's Milton's Good God, Lieb assesses Milton's investment in an emotive God of "passibility" (146), which he terms theopatheia in opposition to anthropopatheia (146): God feels, in other words, but he does so not in an imitatively human way, so that we can approximate an understanding of him, but rather because his "emotional life ...
I prefer, however, to see Kafka as a starting point for Roth, an origin who, like any father, can't be ignored but who needn't, either, be reproduced imitatively, and who frees his successor to make inquiries for which he might otherwise have no form for the asking.