imitative

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im·i·ta·tive

 (ĭm′ĭ-tā′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of or involving imitation.
2. Not original; derivative.
3. Tending to imitate.
4. Onomatopoeic.

im′i·ta′tive·ly adv.
im′i·ta′tive·ness n.

imitative

(ˈɪmɪtətɪv)
adj
1. imitating or tending to imitate or copy
2. characterized by imitation
3. copying or reproducing the features of an original, esp in an inferior manner: imitative painting.
4. (Linguistics) another word for onomatopoeic
ˈimitatively adv
ˈimitativeness n

im•i•ta•tive

(ˈɪm ɪˌteɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. imitating; copying; given to imitation.
2. of, pertaining to, or characterized by imitation.
3. made in imitation of something; counterfeit.
4. onomatopoeic.
[1575–85; < Late Latin]
im′i•ta`tive•ly, adv.
im′i•ta`tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imitative - marked by or given to imitation; "acting is an imitative art"; "man is an imitative being"
nonimitative - not marked by or given to imitation
2.imitative - (of words) formed in imitation of a natural sound; "onomatopoeic words are imitative of noises"; "it was independently developed in more than one place as an onomatopoetic term"- Harry Hoijer
3.imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"
artificial, unreal - contrived by art rather than nature; "artificial flowers"; "artificial flavoring"; "an artificial diamond"; "artificial fibers"; "artificial sweeteners"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"
false - not in accordance with the fact or reality or actuality; "gave false testimony under oath"; "false tales of bravery"

imitative

adjective
1. copying, mimicking, derivative, copycat (informal), unoriginal, mimetic, echoic Babies of this age are highly imitative.
2. copied, put-on, mimicking, similar, mock, second-hand, simulated, pseudo (informal), parrot-like, unoriginal, plagiarized, mimetic, onomatopoeic This may lead to excitement and to imitative behaviour.

imitative

adjective
1. Copying another in an inferior or obsequious way:
2. Imitating sounds:
Translations
مُقَلِّد، مُحاكٍ
napodobující
efterlignende
hermi-
napodobňujúci

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] ADJimitativo
a style imitative of Joyce'sun estilo que imita el de Joyce

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adj
[person, animal] to be imitative → imiter ce que l'on fait
Babies of eight to twelve months are generally highly imitative → Les bébés de 8 à 12 mois imitent généralement tout ce que l'on fait.
[behaviour] → imitatif/ive

imitative

adjnachahmend, imitierend; children are naturally imitativeKinder machen von Natur aus alles nach

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adjimitativo/a

imitate

(ˈimiteit) verb
to (try to) be, behave or look the same as (a person etc). Children imitate their friends rather than their parents; He could imitate the song of many different birds.
ˌimiˈtation noun
1. the act of imitating. Children learn how to speak by imitation.
2. a copy. an imitation of an ancient statue.
adjective
made to look like something else. imitation wood.
ˈimitative (-tətiv) adjective
ˈimitativeness noun
ˈimitator noun
a person who imitates.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reward tor engaging in this self-fashioning is a fundamentally aesthetic realignment with those features of our subjective, social, and cultural conditions that a poem calls on us to participate in, even in the act of imitatively engaging with its form and matter.
Therefore, the control strategy cannot be imitatively used in traction motor.
In the next to last line that word reappears--again with the soprano's emphasis, though not by imitatively trembling this time--but it is associated with sense, the trembling sense, an image that combines an aspect of the sublime with the physical image of the violin string.
And in reference to my more diachronic concern, with respect to the imitatively nostalgic romanceros against which Fuchs juxtaposes her examination of the jinete tradition, could it not be argued that the genre is always already maurophilic?
The answer that Smith argues for is that music induces various emotional states without imitating them, and that the merest suggestion of reference--in the more imitatively capable media of word, gesture, and picture--allows us to suppose that the emotions we experience are imitative.
We need an account of learning to be friends with those who differ from us in significant respects, but we do not get this from Hauerwas, and this leaves us with the question of our own capacities, as imitatively desiring people, to be friends with each other.
That is the danger in using a foreign language slavishly, or even imitatively, without mastering it.
Similarly, while Christopher Prendergast discusses the heroine's exceptional originality at some length, he comments that his account "has also to be tempered by the extent to which she too is caught in the 'mimetic trap" imitatively basing her desires and actions on heroic images of her sixteenth-century ancestors" For an alternative perspective on mimetic desire in Stendhal's heroines, more compatible with the argument presented in this article, see Scott.
Organizations that hire such executives from a rival will tend to respond more quickly and more imitatively to a competitive action.
A poet as imitatively correct and biographically un-newsworthy as Battiferra had few hopes of engaging sustained interest--at most, she might aspire to some slim notice as the wife of the architect Bartolomeo Ammanati, or muse and sitter to Agnolo Bronzino.
Even more imitatively as well as conventionally, Krauth (1999: 17) talks of how Clemens fled the Civil War by "lighting out" for the West, where by "default, chance, and design" he literally made himself--"a hit-and-miss enterprise, for he was as unsteady as the tumbleweed".
Consistently, imitatively and successfully, Irish playwrights have relied upon dismal social situations in order to energise their realities.