imitative

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im·i·ta·tive

 (ĭm′ĭ-tā′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of or involving imitation.
2. Not original; derivative.
3. Tending to imitate.
4. Onomatopoeic.

im′i·ta′tive·ly adv.
im′i·ta′tive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

imitative

(ˈɪmɪtətɪv)
adj
1. imitating or tending to imitate or copy
2. characterized by imitation
3. copying or reproducing the features of an original, esp in an inferior manner: imitative painting.
4. (Linguistics) another word for onomatopoeic
ˈimitatively adv
ˈimitativeness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•i•ta•tive

(ˈɪm ɪˌteɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. imitating; copying; given to imitation.
2. of, pertaining to, or characterized by imitation.
3. made in imitation of something; counterfeit.
4. onomatopoeic.
[1575–85; < Late Latin]
im′i•ta`tive•ly, adv.
im′i•ta`tive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imitative - marked by or given to imitation; "acting is an imitative art"; "man is an imitative being"
nonimitative - not marked by or given to imitation
2.imitative - (of words) formed in imitation of a natural sound; "onomatopoeic words are imitative of noises"; "it was independently developed in more than one place as an onomatopoetic term"- Harry Hoijer
3.imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"
artificial, unreal - contrived by art rather than nature; "artificial flowers"; "artificial flavoring"; "an artificial diamond"; "artificial fibers"; "artificial sweeteners"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"
false - not in accordance with the fact or reality or actuality; "gave false testimony under oath"; "false tales of bravery"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

imitative

adjective
1. copying, mimicking, derivative, copycat (informal), unoriginal, mimetic, echoic Babies of this age are highly imitative.
2. copied, put-on, mimicking, similar, mock, second-hand, simulated, pseudo (informal), parrot-like, unoriginal, plagiarized, mimetic, onomatopoeic This may lead to excitement and to imitative behaviour.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

imitative

adjective
1. Copying another in an inferior or obsequious way:
2. Imitating sounds:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُقَلِّد، مُحاكٍ
napodobující
efterlignende
hermi-
napodobňujúci

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] ADJimitativo
a style imitative of Joyce'sun estilo que imita el de Joyce
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adj
[person, animal] to be imitative → imiter ce que l'on fait
Babies of eight to twelve months are generally highly imitative → Les bébés de 8 à 12 mois imitent généralement tout ce que l'on fait.
[behaviour] → imitatif/ive
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

imitative

adjnachahmend, imitierend; children are naturally imitativeKinder machen von Natur aus alles nach
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adjimitativo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

imitate

(ˈimiteit) verb
to (try to) be, behave or look the same as (a person etc). Children imitate their friends rather than their parents; He could imitate the song of many different birds.
ˌimiˈtation noun
1. the act of imitating. Children learn how to speak by imitation.
2. a copy. an imitation of an ancient statue.
adjective
made to look like something else. imitation wood.
ˈimitative (-tətiv) adjective
ˈimitativeness noun
ˈimitator noun
a person who imitates.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Lawson painted in a certain way because it was his nature to, and through the imitativeness of a student sensitive to every influence, there pierced individuality.
According to Turkmen leader, this are the flexibility and mobility of business, its subtle feeling of market situation, fast learning, energy and imitativeness, which are necessary for current changing economic realities in order to make fast move forward and to make raise to new development.
But what would have ruffled feathers the most is Morsi's underscoring an excess of imitativeness of European art, itself at times superficially understood, and several Iraqi artists' inability to bypass that predicament.
As Lucy Bland explains: "Women, 'lower races' and children" were thought to share a "lack of willpower, emotionality, dependence, imitativeness, and little capacity for abstract thought." (7) Darwin's groundbreaking discoveries in The Origin of the Species (1859) justified the watchful eye of the white British man under the auspices of empire, for civilization, defined as "white, masculine and adult," needed protection from "its antithesis"--the "primitive, female and childlike." (8) Laura Doyle explains that an alternative term for Darwin's scientific racism is paedomorphism, which "aligned all women with the 'lower races' by suggesting that both embodied the childhood of humanity," evolutionary-speaking.
As a white human parasite (all slave owners over historical time have been/are human parasites) on his Black slaves and their labor-power, Jefferson was a direct beneficiary of the putative dullness, tastelessness, anomalousness, and imitativeness that he discerned in Africans.
(65) Much talk of a local jazz club, divided into two factions, traditional and advanced jazz fans; and remarked upon the complete imitativeness in ideas and popularity polls among their members of the American jazz scene.
The late 18th to mid-19th centuries were, as is well known, a crucial formative period when Russia overcame its earlier imitativeness vis-a-vis the aristocratic culture of ancien regime Europe and developed a distinctive identity that allowed it to play a leading role in the development of modern European culture.
(3) Well into the twentieth century, the charge of black imitativeness fueled objections to black higher education.
During the 1830s and 1840s, Emerson blasts imitativeness with the rhetoric of doom, death, and decay.
As a result, the racialized split between white "originality" and African-American "imitativeness" can no longer be maintained.
arrogance, imitativeness, and dim-wittedness of the upper classes ...
Throughout colonial Ghana at this time, pomposity and imitativeness were frowned upon by highly-educated Africans; in particular, the use of bombastic English was considered to be a hallmark of the 'semi-educated' classes, regarded not as a sign of intelligence but as a mark of a person's over-inflated ambition and illegitimate social aspirations.