immanentism


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im·ma·nent·ism

 (ĭm′ə-nən-tĭz′əm)
n.
Any of various religious theories postulating that a deity, mind, or spirit is immanent in the world and in the individual.

im′ma·nent·ist adj. & n.

immanentism

(ˈɪmənənˌtɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) belief in the immanence of God
ˈimmanentist n

im•ma•nent•ism

(ˈɪm ə nənˌtɪz əm)

n.
a belief that the Deity indwells and operates directly within the universe or nature.
[1905–10]
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References in periodicals archive ?
This speaks of an immanentism and autonomy capable of providing form and meaning to the world from within cyberspace.
He was thus connecting his own aesthetic experimentation to the shift towards immanentism in the Church.
It becomes possible to "be a partisan of a really and indissolubly free subject while simultaneously and without incoherence or self-contradiction remaining entirely faithful to the uncompromising atheism and immanentism of the combative materialist tradition.
Considering the ecological crisis "like the social and economic crisis" only from a technical and political angle leads back to a retreat into a pure immanentism.
While these lack the meaning and efficacy of the sacraments instituted by Christ, they can be channels which the Holy Spirit raises up in order to liberate non-Christians from atheistic immanentism or from purely individual religious experiences.
These include an extreme this-worldliness or immanentism, a forgetfulness of the soul, and an inability to understand how the spirit is borne in history.
GREIMAS, 1963), the author distances himself from the historicism that marked his earlier works and moves towards the immanentism and to the development of his greater project: the semiotics.
10) Immanentism paves the way for a complex web of largely interest-based relationships in families and religious communities whose baffling consequences threaten to destroy the very foundation of interpersonal relationships.
The style of writing and terminology used may be fine for academics, but I do wonder how most health-care practitioners will respond to sentences, such as "However Pellegrino's Thomistic elevation of rationality is challenged by O'Donovan's caution that the rationalist tradition tends to move toward a reductive immanentism and premature eschatological fulfillment .
NSFW: Experiencing immanentism or transcendence upon hearing Gilbert Gottfried's rendition of Fifty Shades of Grey in the postmodern workplace, or liberatory criminology.
While gathering the contributions of that tradition, the young scholar operated a rupture, for, as is stated by Vidal, <<his scientific axiology was partly delineated in order to show that immanentism was the noblest, most objective attitude, and to justify God's identification with the norms of a universal and impersonal reason>>.
In addition, Fichte's The Way to a Blessed Life, which became Bakunin's favourite work, gave him the inspiration for the religious but extra-ecclesiastical immanentism that he developed in the mid-1830s before encountering Hegel.