immanent

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Related to immanentist: immanence

immanent

innate, inborn, intrinsic: an immanent gift of musical ability; inherent; existing or remaining within; subjective
Not to be confused with:
emanate – to flow out, issue, or proceed; come forth; originate; emit; arise, spring: His great talent emanates from the very depths of his being.
eminent – prominent; distinguished; noteworthy: an eminent author
imminent – about to occur at any moment; impending: in imminent danger
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

im·ma·nent

 (ĭm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Existing or remaining within; inherent: believed in a God immanent in humans.
2. Restricted entirely to the mind; subjective.

[Late Latin immanēns, immanent-, present participle of immanēre, to remain in : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin manēre, to remain; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

im′ma·nence, im′ma·nen·cy n.
im′ma·nent·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

immanent

(ˈɪmənənt)
adj
1. existing, operating, or remaining within; inherent
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to the pantheistic conception of God, as being present throughout the universe. Compare transcendent3
[C16: from Latin immanēre to remain in, from im- (in) + manēre to stay]
ˈimmanence, ˈimmanency n
ˈimmanently adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•ma•nent

(ˈɪm ə nənt)

adj.
1. remaining within; indwelling; inherent.
2. (of the Deity) indwelling the universe, time, etc. Compare transcendent (def. 3).
[1525–35; < Late Latin immanēre to stay in its own place = Latin im- im-1 + manēre to stay]
im′ma•nent•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
imminent, immanent - Imminent is "about to happen" and immanent is "inherent" or "pervading the material world."
See also related terms for inherent.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.immanent - of a mental act performed entirely within the mind; "a cognition is an immanent act of mind"
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
transeunt, transient - of a mental act; causing effects outside the mind
2.immanent - of qualities that are spread throughout something; "ambition is immanent in human nature"; "we think of God as immanent in nature"
distributive - serving to distribute or allot or disperse
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

immanent

adjective inherent, innate, intrinsic, natural, internal, indigenous, subjective, congenital, inborn, hard-wired, indwelling hierarchy as the immanent principle of Western society
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

immanent

[ˈɪmənənt] ADJinmanente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

immanent

[ˈɪmənənt] (formal) adjimmanent(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

immanent

adjinnewohnend, immanent (also Philos); to be immanent in somethingeiner Sache (dat)eigen sein or innewohnen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Between religiosity and spirituality: Christianity and the reemergence of the immanentist spiritualities.
This strongly immanentist approach naturally raises the question of God's relation to our own experience.
Ambiguously, these writers discussed an immanentist theory of mind, but also re-stated a version of the Fall myth in terms of mental evolution and corruption.
However, on the other hand, a totally immanentist vision of God also has its risks.
Both approaches appear resolutely immanentist and focus on the coming-together and falling-apart of assemblages of humans and non-humans, rather than transcendent divisions between Nature and Culture or Subject and Object.
And while science places man among the animals, theology follows the lead of poetry and goes beyond what a strict immanentist naturalism would allow in affirming that there is in the animal a real lack.
A distinction gradually emerges between an immanentist approach to signification (centred on the production of the message, the object is to be deciphered, all one needs to be able to decipher the meanings is to be able to read properly) and a constructivist approach (centred on reception, I construct the message just as it constructs me depending on what I am).
This is a symbiotic, immanentist, and creative form of behaviour, one naturally prone towards an egalitarian and somewhat anarchic micro-political stance.
Sell, Theology in Turmoil (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 1986), offers a rather ideological critique of liberal religion, which it defines as "immanentist" and rationalist as against evangelical authentic Christianity which insists on sin, grace, and regeneration as supernatural events.
In cultural retrospect, it is disappointing that though the Flavin Icons were made during Vatican II, which conservatives still accuse of being all too immanentist in thrust, Flavin might conceivably have produced some appropriate new mode of post-Conciliar religious icon, had he not jumped ship.
This model is distinguished by privileging the web of economic life that surrounds economic action, the elevation of the a posteriori empirical over the a priori rational for driving economic change, the rejection of performative intervention of economic theory into material economies, immanentist Daoism and Confucianism as opposed to Protestant transcendentalism, the rejection of the notion of "externalities" to economic exchange (what the West would call "externalities" being instead understood as an integral part of the web of economic exchange), a relational versus individualist understanding of property rights, and relational understandings of risk (particularly between generations of a family and in long-term guanxi-like business relations.