immediatism


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immediatism

(ɪˈmiːdɪəˌtɪzəm)
n
the policy of taking immediate action

immediatism

immediateness; the quality or condition of being immediate.
See also: Time
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pragmatism contributes utilitarianism, immediatism, adaptability, the objective of producing useful, applicable learning and of adjusting the individual to a reality that is extremely dynamic and mobile (12).
Within reach of the distrust of the merchants of death who fight each other for control over the favela, they need to be vigilant to resist the pressure of immediatism, consumption, and the changing webs of involvement in crime.
Slave rebellions, Sinha sensibly insists, lay at the heart of the abolitionist movement and forced moderate whites to abandon gradualism for immediatism. And far more than their white allies, black abolitionists denounced racism and theories of black inferiority, which were then prevalent around the Atlantic world.
She recasts the emergence of immediate abolitionism as an "interracial immediatism" arising from black protest from David Walker to Freedom's Journal.
To give a recent example: The immediatism of the media, as in the case of the recent terror bombings in Istanbul's Sultan Ahmet quarter, led to a decrease of tourist bookings by 40 per cent.
Guarneri, "Brook Farm and the Fourierist Phalanxes: Immediatism, Gradualism, and American Utopian Socialism," in Pitzer, America's Communal Utopias, 160-68.
Colin Bundy characterizes youth politics of this period as 'immediatism', marked by 'an impatient anticipation of imminent victory, a hubristic assessment of progress made, and a naive underestimation of the resources of the state' (Bundy 1987: 322-3).
1816); David Brion Davis, The Emergence of Immediatism in British and American Antislavery Thought, 49 MISS.
Speaker Tom Army, professor of history at UMass - Amherst, "From Gradualism to Immediatism: The Black Abolitionist Movement in the Coming of the Civil War,'' 7 p.m.
Mott was an early convert to antislavery immediatism, Faulkner suggests even before William Lloyd Garrison, and remained dedicated to the cause of free produce long after the abolitionist luminary.
Mott converted to "immediatism" after reading Elizabeth Heyrick's influential pamphlet, Immediate, not Gradual Abolition or An Inquiry Into the Shortest, Safest, and Most Effectual Means of Getting Rid of West Indian Slavery, published in England in 1824.