immigrancy

immigrancy

(ˈɪmɪɡrənsɪ)
n
the state or condition of being an immigrant or a person who comes to a country in order to settle there
another name for immigration1
References in periodicals archive ?
poetry of immigrancy and migrancy, referencing dozens of poets (including Euro-Americans) who reflect this perennial American experience.
Similar to the naturalized writers, Nova Scotian writers expressed a kind of spiritual exile or immigrancy bound within the values of the Maritimes which can be perceived as being somewhat removed from the rest of Canada.
Thus, immigrancy has become a metonym for globalization that reifies the nation's discrete boundaries and affirms only a single historical memory.
For more on the difference between migrancy, immigrancy, and transmigrancy, see Linda Green Basch, Nina Glick Schiller, and Cristina Szanton Blanc, Nations Unbound (NY: Routledge, 1994).
Recent immigrancy allows for the development of a stereotype of Canadian Muslims as being insular, poor, indifferent to Canadian society, and more concerned with life in their country of origin.
I won't summarize all these articles (the one on Augustine and John Updike strikes me as weak and strained) but end with the final one: "Cavell and Holderlin on Human Immigrancy." "Immigrancy" is a term explicitly used by Cavell for our condition.
border guards turned back a young guy headed for Canada with more than a weekend's worth of luggage in tow and a i -A draft card in his wallet - or if the Canadian immigration authorities didn't grant us Landed Immigrancy? And how to finance our escape?
Second, there are a number of very telling parallels between the here-and-now situation of these secular Jewish intellectuals in the latter decades of the twentieth century in America, and Freud's own situation as a Jew within fin-de-siecle Germanic culture, which also had to do with the anxieties and dynamics of immigrancy. Third, as may already be evident, psychoanalytic terms and perspectives are theoretically central to my discussion of the ways in which these two related cultural predicaments are dealt with.
Such are the possibilities which it holds out to those willing to pay the steep price of staying the distance on a long and arduous journey to an uncertain end; in this respect psychoanalysis is not a little like the process of immigrancy itself.