imminent


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to imminent: Imminent Domain

imminent

about to occur at any moment; impending: in imminent danger
Not to be confused with:
emanate – to flow out, issue, or proceed; come forth; originate; emit; arise, spring: His great talent emanates from the very depths of his being.
eminent – prominent; distinguished; noteworthy: an eminent author
immanent – innate, inborn, intrinsic: an immanent gift of musical ability; inherent; existing or remaining within; subjective
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

im·mi·nent

 (ĭm′ə-nənt)
adj.
About to occur; impending: in imminent danger.

[Middle English iminent, from Old French imminent, from Latin imminēns, imminent-, present participle of imminēre, to overhang : in-, in; see in-2 + -minēre, to jut, threaten; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

im′mi·nent·ly adv.
im′mi·nent·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

imminent

(ˈɪmɪnənt)
adj
1. liable to happen soon; impending
2. obsolete jutting out or overhanging
[C16: from Latin imminēre to project over, from im- (in) + -minēre to project; related to mons mountain]
ˈimminence, ˈimminentness n
ˈimminently adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•mi•nent

(ˈɪm ə nənt)

adj.
1. likely to occur at any moment; impending: Her death is imminent.
2. projecting or leaning forward; overhanging.
[1520–30; < Latin imminēre to overhang]
im′mi•nent•ly, adv.
im′mi•nent•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

imminent

, immanent - Imminent is "about to happen" and immanent is "inherent" or "pervading the material world."
See also related terms for inherent.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imminent - close in timeimminent - close in time; about to occur; "retribution is at hand"; "some people believe the day of judgment is close at hand"; "in imminent danger"; "his impending retirement"
close - at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other; "close to noon"; "how close are we to town?"; "a close formation of ships"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

imminent

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

imminent

adjective
About to occur at any moment:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
داهِم، وَشيك الوُقوع
blízkýhrozící
közelgõ
yfirvofandi
gresiantisneišvengiamumas
draudošsnenovēršams
eli kulağındayakın

imminent

[ˈɪmɪnənt] ADJ (= impending) → inminente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

imminent

[ˈɪmɪnənt] adjimminent(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

imminent

adjnahe bevorstehend; to be imminentnahe bevorstehen; I think an announcement is imminentich glaube, es steht eine Ankündigung bevor
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

imminent

[ˈɪmɪnənt] adjimminente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

imminent

(ˈiminənt) adjective
(especially of something unpleasant) likely to happen etc very soon. A storm is imminent.
ˈimminence noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

imminent

a. inminente; irremediable.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
His greatest admirer could not have cordially justified his bringing his harpoon into breakfast with him, and using it there without ceremony; reaching over the table with it, to the imminent jeopardy of many heads, and grappling the beefsteaks towards him.
I thought him a trifle excited, which surprised me, for he had a reputation for exceptional coolness, even in moments of sudden and imminent peril.
There is another pump room, into which infirm ladies and gentlemen are wheeled, in such an astonishing variety of chairs and chaises, that any adventurous individual who goes in with the regular number of toes, is in imminent danger of coming out without them; and there is a third, into which the quiet people go, for it is less noisy than either.
For what dread of want or poverty that can reach or harass the student can compare with what the soldier feels, who finds himself beleaguered in some stronghold mounting guard in some ravelin or cavalier, knows that the enemy is pushing a mine towards the post where he is stationed, and cannot under any circumstances retire or fly from the imminent danger that threatens him?
On the second day of her hunting, as she was returning from the chase, and was arrived within a little distance from Mr Western's house, her horse, whose mettlesome spirit required a better rider, fell suddenly to prancing and capering in such a manner that she was in the most imminent peril of falling.
And the institution of the family, and the emotions that arise therein, the fierce jealousy, the tenderness for offspring, parental self-devotion, all found their justification and support in the imminent dangers of the young.
Foreseeing, to men of Bulstrode's anxious temperament, is often worse than seeing; and his imagination continually heightened the anguish of an imminent disgrace.
Till then, at least, he was free and must do something for himself, for the danger was imminent.
The lapse of time during which a given event has not happened, is, in this logic of habit, constantly alleged as a reason why the event should never happen, even when the lapse of time is precisely the added condition which makes the event imminent. A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink; and it is often observable, that the older a man gets, the more difficult it is to him to retain a believing conception of his own death.
It is not yet forgotten that well-grounded apprehensions of imminent danger induced the people of America to form the memorable Congress of 1774.
The danger could not be imminent. The Scotia, divided into seven compartments by strong partitions, could brave with impunity any leak.
Grimaud had, indeed, during twenty-two years of service, seen his master extricate himself from so many difficulties that nothing less than Athos's imminent death was likely to make him uneasy.