immiscible


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im·mis·ci·ble

 (ĭ-mĭs′ə-bəl)
adj.
That cannot undergo mixing or blending: immiscible elements.

im·mis′ci·bil′i·ty n.
im·mis′ci·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

immiscible

(ɪˈmɪsɪbəl)
adj
(of two or more liquids) incapable of being mixed to form a homogeneous substance: oil and water are immiscible.
imˌmisciˈbility n
imˈmiscibly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•mis•ci•ble

(ɪˈmɪs ə bəl)

adj.
not miscible; incapable of being mixed.
[1665–75]
im•mis`ci•bil′i•ty, n.
im•mis′ci•bly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

im·mis·ci·ble

(ĭ-mĭs′ə-bəl)
Incapable of being mixed or blended together. Immiscible liquids that are shaken together eventually separate into layers. Oil and water are immiscible.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

immiscible


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Describes substances which do not mix and form more than one phase when brought together.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.immiscible - (chemistry, physics) incapable of mixing
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
miscible, mixable - (chemistry, physics) capable of being mixed
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

immiscible

[ɪˈmɪsɪbəl] adj (frm) → immiscibile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Top players in the global alcohol ethoxylate are focusing on lucrative growth opportunities in developing economies as a consequence of recently acquired economic prosperity and trending use of surfactants in immiscible phase treatment applications in the market.
The BaroShear K45 system is based on the company's Ultra Sheer Technology platform, which applies high-pressure much greater than 20,000 pounds per square inch to create nano-scale emulsion mixtures of otherwise immiscible fluids -- like oils and water -- that results in stable homogenized products called nanoemulsions.
For example, the company offers specialised mixing systems for highly viscous substances and blending homogeneously immiscible fluids whilst maintaining ingredient stability.
Two immiscible phases used in droplet-based systems are the continuous phase (the medium in which droplets flow) and the dispersed phase (the droplet phase).
Both, nature and technology are immiscible and should be independent of each other.
Nanocomposites of organic nano-montmorillonite (nano-OMMT)-filled immiscible polyamide 6 (PA6)/polystyrene (PS) blends were prepared by three different processing methods.
Since Nakagawa [1] first detected the liquid phase separation in undercooled Cu-Fe and Cu-Co systems by magnetic methods in 1958, liquid immiscible alloys have been attracting wide attention from the researchers in materials science [2-4].
They cover the Hele-Shaw problem, a joint motion of two immiscible viscous fluids, mathematical models of in-situ leaching, and the dynamics of cracks in rocks.
Since most of the polymers are immiscible [5], the combinations of immiscible polymers involve chemical reactions and physical influences [6].
However, most of polymers are immiscible with each other because of the positive Gibbs energy of mixing, which results in serious phase separation, poor adhesion in interfaces, and deteriorated ultimate properties.
[16] reported that magnetic particles (ferrofluids) could have both miscible and immiscible behaviors with water.