immunity

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immunity

being unaffected by something; a resistance to disease: The vaccine gave the children immunity to polio.; a legally established condition: The court granted the witness immunity from prosecution.
Not to be confused with:
impunity – exemption from punishment or harm: He carried out his evil act with impunity.

im·mu·ni·ty

 (ĭ-myo͞o′nĭ-tē)
n. pl. im·mu·ni·ties
1. The quality or condition of being immune: "His above-average size during adolescence did not purchase immunity from the depredations of school bullies" (Stephen S. Hall).
2. Immunology Inherited, acquired, or induced resistance to infection by a specific pathogen.
3. Law
a. Exemption from certain generally applicable requirements of law or from certain liabilities, granted to special groups of people to facilitate the performance of their public functions: diplomatic immunity; judicial immunity.
b. Exemption from prosecution granted to a witness to compel him or her to give potentially self-incriminating testimony that otherwise could not be compelled because of the constitutional right against self-incrimination.
c. Exemption from being sued: sovereign immunity; charitable immunity.
4. A condition conferred upon a contestant that prevents him or her from being eliminated from a competition for a certain time period: The winner of the challenge was given immunity for the following challenge.

immunity

(ɪˈmjuːnɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Biology) the ability of an organism to resist disease, either through the activities of specialized blood cells or antibodies produced by them in response to natural exposure or inoculation (active immunity) or by the injection of antiserum or the transfer of antibodies from a mother to her baby via the placenta or breast milk (passive immunity). See also acquired immunity, natural immunity
2. freedom from obligation or duty, esp exemption from tax, duty, legal liability, etc
3. any special privilege granting immunity
4. (Law) the exemption of ecclesiastical persons or property from various civil obligations or liabilities

im•mu•ni•ty

(ɪˈmyu nɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state of being immune from a particular disease or the like.
2. the condition that permits either natural or acquired resistance to disease.
3. the ability of a cell to react immunologically in the presence of an antigen.
4. exemption from any natural or usual liability.
5. exemption from obligation, service, duty, liability, or prosecution.
syn: See exemption.

im·mu·ni·ty

(ĭ-myo͞o′nĭ-tē)
Resistance of the body to infection by a disease-causing agent, such as a bacterium or virus. Immunity is usually provided by the body's own immune system, which is determined by the action of one's genes. It may also be brought about by having had a disease or infection in the past and recovering from it. Immunity can also be induced artificially, especially by vaccination.

immunity

1. Resistance to disease.
2. The body’s effective resistance against a diseasecausing organism. Immunity can be innate or acquired by producing antibodies. See antibodies, antigens.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.immunity - the state of not being susceptibleimmunity - the state of not being susceptible; "unsusceptibility to rust"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
exemption, freedom - immunity from an obligation or duty
2.immunity - (medicine) the condition in which an organism can resist disease
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
immunogenicity - the property of eliciting an immune response
acquired immunity - immunity to a particular disease that is not innate but has been acquired during life; immunity can be acquired by the development of antibodies after an attack of an infectious disease or by a pregnant mother passing antibodies through the placenta to a fetus or by vaccination
innate immunity, natural immunity - immunity to disease that occurs as part of an individual's natural biologic makeup
3.immunity - the quality of being unaffected by something; "immunity to criticism"
invulnerability - the property of being invulnerable; the property of being incapable of being hurt (physically or emotionally)
4.immunity - an act exempting someone; "he was granted immunity from prosecution"
waiver, discharge, release - a formal written statement of relinquishment
fix - an exemption granted after influence (e.g., money) is brought to bear; "collusion resulted in tax fixes for gamblers"
official immunity - personal immunity accorded to a public official from liability to anyone injured by actions that are the consequence of exerting official authority
sovereign immunity - an exemption that precludes bringing a suit against the sovereign government without the government's consent; "the doctrine of sovereign immunity originated with the maxim that the king can do no wrong"
testimonial immunity, use immunity - an exemption that displaces the privilege against self-incrimination; neither compelled testimony or any fruits of it can be used against the witness who therefore can no longer fear self-incrimination

immunity

noun
1. exemption, amnesty, indemnity, release, freedom, liberty, privilege, prerogative, invulnerability, exoneration The police are offering immunity to witnesses who can help them.
2. (with to) resistance to, protection from, resilience to, inoculation against, immunization from immunity to airborne bacteria
resistance to exposure to, susceptibility to, liability to, vulnerability to, openness to, proneness to

immunity

noun
Translations
مناعَه، حَصانَه
imunitaodolnost
immunitetmodstandsdygtighed
immunitásmentesség
ónæmi
imunita

immunity

[ɪˈmjuːnɪtɪ] N (Med, fig) → inmunidad f; (from tax, regulations) → exención f (from de) diplomatic immunityinmunidad f diplomática
parliamentary immunityinmunidad f parlamentaria

immunity

[ɪˈmjuːnɪti] n
(to disease)immunité f
immunity to sth → immunité contre qch
(from prosecution)immunité f
to grant sb immunity from prosecution → accorder l'immunité à qn (pour ses délits ou crimes) diplomatic immunity

immunity

n
(Med) → Immunität f(to, against gegen)
(fig)Sicherheit f (→ from vor +dat); (diplomatic) → Immunität f; (to temptation etc) → Geschütztheit f, → Gefeitheit f(to gegen); (= imperviousness to criticism etc)Unempfindlichkeit f, → Immunität f(to gegen); immunity from prosecutionSchutz mvor Strafverfolgung

immunity

[ɪˈmjuːnɪtɪ] n (also) (fig) → immunità
diplomatic immunity → immunità diplomatica

immune

(iˈmjuːn) adjective
(with to or from) protected against, or naturally resistant to, eg a disease. immune to measles; immune from danger.
imˈmunity noun
ˈimmunize, ˈimmunise (ˈimju-) verb
to make immune to a disease, especially by an injection of a weak form of the disease.
ˌimmuniˈzation, ˌimmuniˈsation noun

im·mu·ni·ty

n. inmunidad.
1. condición del organismo de resistir a un determinado antígeno por activación de anticuerpos específicos;
2. resistencia creada por el organismo en contra de una enfermedad específica;
acquired ______ adquirida;
active ______ activa;
adoptive ______ adoptiva;
antiviral ______ antivírica;
artificial ______ artificial;
bacteriophage ______ bateriófaga;
concomitant ______ concomitante;
general ___general ___;
group ______ de grupo;
inborn ______ nata;
innate ______ innata;
maternal ______ materna;
natural ______ natural;
passive ______ pasiva.

immunity

n inmunidad f; immunity to..inmunidad a or contra; herd — inmunidad colectiva or de grupo
References in classic literature ?
In the fourth article of the Confederation, it is declared "that the FREE INHABITANTS of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice, excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of FREE CITIZENS in the several States; and THE PEOPLE of each State shall, in every other, enjoy all the privileges of trade and commerce," etc.
In personal qualifications,'' he added, ``it was possible that Prince John might be inferior to his brother Richard; but when it was considered that the latter returned with the sword of vengeance in his hand, while the former held out rewards, immunities, privileges, wealth, and honours, it could not be doubted which was the king whom in wisdom the nobility were called on to support.''
Croix enjoyed certain immunities which had been reserved to him.
Whatever views the world might entertain of this act of the Major, to himself and to his child it seemed no more than a natural gift by a father of those immunities which he could no longer enjoy or improve, to a son, who was formed, both by nature and education, to do both.
And might it not be well at the same time to provide by law for the enforcement of that clause in the Constitution which guarantees that "the citizen of each State shall be entitled to all privileged and immunities of citizens in the several States?"
The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States.
The International Organizations Immunities Act of 1945 grants international organizations such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization the "same immunity from suit .
It requires the borrower to 'irrevocably waive (i) any and all of its privileges and sovereign immunities from and against any lawsuit and enforcement of arbitral award and (ii) any and all privileges and sovereign immunities on any of its properties from and against any attachment, enforcement and any other legal proceedings, both of which it may be entitled to as a legal defense under any applicable international or domestic law.'
approach is understandable: both immunities are convoluted and
INTERNATIONAL LAWBoris Becker, the former top world tennis player, pulled a first of strange diplomatic immunities known to man when he declared he had protection as a diplomat of Central African Republic.
He said the aim and object of the treaty stated that the purpose of such privileges and immunities was not to benefit individuals but to ensure efficient performance of diplomatic missions as representing states.
He said that the aim and object of the VCDR states that 'the purpose of such privileges and immunities is not to benefit individuals but to ensure the efficient performance of the functions of diplomatic missions as representing states.'