impeachable


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im·peach

 (ĭm-pēch′)
tr.v. im·peached, im·peach·ing, im·peach·es
1.
a. To make an accusation against: impeach someone of a crime.
b. To bring formal charges against (a public official) for wrongdoing while in office.
2. To raise doubts about; discredit or disparage: impeach a witness's credibility; impeach someone's character.

[Middle English empechen, to impede, accuse, from Anglo-Norman empecher, from Late Latin impedicāre, to entangle : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin pedica, fetter; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

im·peach′a·ble adj.
im·peach′a·bil′i·ty n.
im·peach′er n.
im·peach′ment n.
Usage Note: When an irate citizen demands that a disfavored public official be impeached, the citizen clearly intends for the official to be removed from office. This popular use of impeach as a synonym of "throw out" (even if by due process) does not accord with the legal meaning of the word. When a public official is impeached, that is, formally accused of wrongdoing, this is only the start of what can be a lengthy process that may or may not lead to the official's removal from office. In strict usage, an official is impeached (accused), tried, and then convicted or acquitted. The vaguer use of impeach reflects disgruntled citizens' indifference to whether the official is forced from office by legal means or chooses to resign to avoid further disgrace.

impeachable

(ɪmˈpiːtʃəbəl)
adj
1. capable of being impeached or accused
2. (Law) (of an offence) making a person liable to impeachment
imˌpeachaˈbility n
Translations

impeachable

[ɪmˈpiːtʃəbl] ADJ [act] → susceptible de acusación por prevaricación; [witness] → recusable

impeachable

adj person(eines Amtsvergehens) anzuklagen; actionals Amtsvergehen verfolgbar
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
And in Delaware and Virginia he is not impeachable till out of office.
In a recent Cato Institute paper, legal writer Jason Vicente notes that most constitutional scholars take the position that "indictable offenses fall within the class of impeachable offenses.
Malacanang on Saturday dismissed as 'pure nonsense' claims that President Rodrigo Duterte may have committed an impeachable offense by releasing a so-called narcolist of 46 politicians with only 58 days to the May 13 elections.
Meanwhile, Roque said that only the Congress can determine if President Duterte allowing foreign interception is a culpable violation of the Constitution and is an impeachable offense.
Gary Alejano (Magdalo party-list) said that the eight justices who sided with the quo warranto petition filed by Solicitor General Jose Calida questioning Sereno's legal hold on office committed an impeachable offense.
It will be a monumental meltdown of the House when trial begins as no impeachable offenses have been committed by CJ Sereno, only lapses in character despised by other justices and demonized by this administration,' Villarin added.
The Administration's actions "clearly rise to the level of impeachable conduct," Conyers writes on his website.
Tomasito Villarin has 'no legal and factual basis' for saying that President Rodrigo Duterte committed an 'impeachable offense' for releasing his so-called narcolist, according to Malacanan Palace.
Presidential Spokesman Harry Roque argued that the magistrates did not commit any impeachable offense since the Supreme Court has jurisdiction on the quo warranto petition seeking the removal of Sereno.
As this developed, members of the Coalition for Justice (CFJ) went to the Senate to reiterate their call on the institution to take a collective stand against the SC's decision to oust Sereno and assert its exclusive right to remove an impeachable official through an impeachment trial.
Under the Senate Impeachment Rules, at least two-thirds of the 24 senators, or 16 of the 23 incumbent senators, are needed to convict an impeachable official, like Sereno.