impeach

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im·peach

 (ĭm-pēch′)
tr.v. im·peached, im·peach·ing, im·peach·es
1.
a. To make an accusation against: impeach someone of a crime.
b. To bring formal charges against (a public official) for wrongdoing while in office.
2. To raise doubts about; discredit or disparage: impeach a witness's credibility; impeach someone's character.

[Middle English empechen, to impede, accuse, from Anglo-Norman empecher, from Late Latin impedicāre, to entangle : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin pedica, fetter; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

im·peach′a·ble adj.
im·peach′a·bil′i·ty n.
im·peach′er n.
im·peach′ment n.
Usage Note: When an irate citizen demands that a disfavored public official be impeached, the citizen clearly intends for the official to be removed from office. This popular use of impeach as a synonym of "throw out" (even if by due process) does not accord with the legal meaning of the word. When a public official is impeached, that is, formally accused of wrongdoing, this is only the start of what can be a lengthy process that may or may not lead to the official's removal from office. In strict usage, an official is impeached (accused), tried, and then convicted or acquitted. The vaguer use of impeach reflects disgruntled citizens' indifference to whether the official is forced from office by legal means or chooses to resign to avoid further disgrace.

impeach

(ɪmˈpiːtʃ)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) criminal law to bring a charge or accusation against
2. (Law) criminal law Brit to accuse of a crime, esp of treason or some other offence against the state
3. (Law) chiefly US to charge (a public official) with an offence committed in office
4. to challenge or question (a person's honesty, integrity, etc)
[C14: from Old French empeechier, from Late Latin impedicāre to entangle, catch, from Latin im- (in) + pedica a fetter, from pēs foot]
imˈpeacher n

im•peach

(ɪmˈpitʃ)
v.t.
1. to accuse (a public official) of misconduct in office by bringing charges before an appropriate tribunal.
2. to challenge the credibility of: to impeach a witness.
3. to bring an accusation against.
4. to cast an imputation upon: to impeach a person's motives.
5. to remove (a public official) from office for misconduct.
n.
6. Obs. impeachment.
[1350–1400; Middle English empechen, enpeshen to impede, accuse < Anglo-French empecher < Late Latin impedicāre to fetter, trap = Latin im- im-1 + -pedicāre, v. derivative of pedica fetter, derivative of pēs foot]
im•peach′er, n.
usage: The correct legal sense of impeach refers only to the bringing of formal charges against an official. Since the purpose of impeachment is the removal from office of an official who has engaged in misconduct, many people focus on the intended result and use impeach to mean “to remove (a public official) from office.” This sense is likely to cause confusion, and people should be aware of the word's proper legal meaning.

impeach


Past participle: impeached
Gerund: impeaching

Imperative
impeach
impeach
Present
I impeach
you impeach
he/she/it impeaches
we impeach
you impeach
they impeach
Preterite
I impeached
you impeached
he/she/it impeached
we impeached
you impeached
they impeached
Present Continuous
I am impeaching
you are impeaching
he/she/it is impeaching
we are impeaching
you are impeaching
they are impeaching
Present Perfect
I have impeached
you have impeached
he/she/it has impeached
we have impeached
you have impeached
they have impeached
Past Continuous
I was impeaching
you were impeaching
he/she/it was impeaching
we were impeaching
you were impeaching
they were impeaching
Past Perfect
I had impeached
you had impeached
he/she/it had impeached
we had impeached
you had impeached
they had impeached
Future
I will impeach
you will impeach
he/she/it will impeach
we will impeach
you will impeach
they will impeach
Future Perfect
I will have impeached
you will have impeached
he/she/it will have impeached
we will have impeached
you will have impeached
they will have impeached
Future Continuous
I will be impeaching
you will be impeaching
he/she/it will be impeaching
we will be impeaching
you will be impeaching
they will be impeaching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been impeaching
you have been impeaching
he/she/it has been impeaching
we have been impeaching
you have been impeaching
they have been impeaching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been impeaching
you will have been impeaching
he/she/it will have been impeaching
we will have been impeaching
you will have been impeaching
they will have been impeaching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been impeaching
you had been impeaching
he/she/it had been impeaching
we had been impeaching
you had been impeaching
they had been impeaching
Conditional
I would impeach
you would impeach
he/she/it would impeach
we would impeach
you would impeach
they would impeach
Past Conditional
I would have impeached
you would have impeached
he/she/it would have impeached
we would have impeached
you would have impeached
they would have impeached
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impeach - challenge the honesty or veracity of; "the lawyers tried to impeach the credibility of the witnesses"
challenge - issue a challenge to; "Fischer challenged Spassky to a match"
2.impeach - charge (a public official) with an offense or misdemeanor committed while in office; "The President was impeached"
lodge, file, charge - file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife"
3.impeach - bring an accusation against; level a charge against; "The neighbors accused the man of spousal abuse"
reproach, upbraid - express criticism towards; "The president reproached the general for his irresponsible behavior"
accuse, charge - blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against; "he charged the director with indifference"
arraign - accuse of a wrong or an inadequacy
recriminate - return an accusation against someone or engage in mutual accusations; charge in return
lodge, file, charge - file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife"

impeach

verb charge, accuse, prosecute, blame, denounce, indict, censure, bring to trial, arraign an opposition move to impeach the President
Translations
obvinit ze zločinu
felelõsségre von
ákæra; kæra fyrir embættisbrot
apkaltaapkaltinti nusikaltimu valstybeipaskelbti apkaltą
apsūdzēt
obviniť zo zločinu

impeach

[ɪmˈpiːtʃ] VT
1. (= doubt) [+ character, motive] → poner en tela de juicio; [+ witness] → recusar
2. [+ public official] (= accuse) → acusar de prevaricación; (= try) → procesar por prevaricación; [+ president] → someter a un proceso de destitución

impeach

[ɪmˈpiːtʃ] vt [+ president] → mettre en cause pénalement

impeach

vt
(Jur: = accuse) public official(eines Amtsvergehens) anklagen; (US) presidentein Amtsenthebungsverfahren or Impeachment einleiten gegen; to impeach somebody for somethingjdn wegen einer Sache anklagen; to impeach somebody for doing somethingjdn anklagen, etw getan zu haben
(= challenge) sb’s character, motivesinfrage or in Frage stellen, anzweifeln; witness’s testimony alsoanfechten; to impeach a witnessdie Glaubwürdigkeit eines Zeugen anzweifeln or anfechten

impeach

[ɪmˈpiːtʃ] vt
a. (esp Am) (prosecute, public official) → mettere in stato d'accusa
b. (challenge, character, motive) → mettere in dubbio

impeach

(imˈpiːtʃ) verb
to accuse of a crime, especially to accuse a person who works for the government of a crime against the State.
imˈpeachment noun
References in classic literature ?
As to Captain Wentworth's views, she deemed it of more consequence that he should know his own mind early enough not to be endangering the happiness of either sister, or impeaching his own honour, than that he should prefer Henrietta to Louisa, or Louisa to Henrietta.
Achar had earlier obtained orders stopping the assembly from impeaching him but the ward representatives said the injunction lapsed on Monday.
The County Assembly is also in the final stages of impeaching the Trade, Tourism and Co-operatives executive Nicholas Tirop.
Billionaire philanthropist Tom Steyer, the high-profile Democrat dedicated to impeaching president Donald Trump, might announce a run for the presidency within the month.
The problem for Pelosi is that Democrats have been in an impeaching mood since election night 2016.
Seventy-six percent of Democratic respondents said they support impeaching Trump, an 8 percentage point increase from April.
That has led some Democrats to conclude that they should focus more on defeating Trump in 2010 than impeaching him before then.
Fifty-one percent were against impeaching President Trump on these allegations.
Released to the public two days later, the Starr Report outlined a case for impeaching Clinton on 11 grounds, including perjury, obstruction of justice, witness-tampering, and abuse of power, and also provided explicit details of the sexual relationship between the president and Monica Lewinsky.
The speaker said that the process of impeaching the state executive was not a tea party, but has to follow due process.
If successful, impeaching eight of the 14 remaining justices will lead to more appointees of President Duterte, who may be forced to name nine more to complete the SC apart from the six justices who voted according to the will of civil society.
While the possibility of impeaching Sereno at the lower chamber is very likely, Monsod said the success of the move to unseat her from her position would yet to be seen at the Senate.