imperatively


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im·per·a·tive

 (ĭm-pĕr′ə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Necessary or urgent: "It is imperative that we continue to move with speed to make housing more affordable" (Timothy Geithner). See Synonyms at urgent.
2. Expressing a command or plea; peremptory: requests that grew more and more imperative.
3. Grammar Of, relating to, or constituting the mood that expresses a command or request.
n.
1.
a. A rule, principle, or need that requires or compels certain action: "the internal tension in [military] doctrine, between the desire to prescribe a common way of fighting and the imperative of adjusting particular military actions to circumstances" (Eliot A. Cohen).
b. A command; an order.
2. Grammar
a. The imperative mood.
b. A verb form of the imperative mood.

[Middle English imperatif, relating to the imperative mood, from Old French, from Late Latin imperātīvus, from Latin imperātus, past participle of imperāre, to command; see emperor.]

im·per′a·tive·ly adv.
im·per′a·tive·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.imperatively - in an imperative and commanding manner
Translations

imperatively

[ɪmˈperətɪvlɪ] ADVimperiosamente
References in classic literature ?
They were half of them laughing, they were all of them talking--the comfortable hum of their voices was at its loudest; the cheery pealing of the laughter was soaring to its highest notes--when one dominant voice, rising clear and shrill above all the rest, called imperatively for silence.
Pearl, looking at this bright wonder of a house began to caper and dance, and imperatively required that the whole breadth of sunshine should be stripped off its front, and given her to play with.
"'Tis a last resource, but let us not employ it till it is imperatively called for; let us rather persevere in our researches."
But Mary herself began to be more agitated by the remembrance of what she had gone through, than she had been by the reality-- questioning those acts of hers which had come imperatively and excluded all question in the critical moment.
Twice again, imperatively, he called Jerry to him, and twice again, with flattened ears of gentleness and wagging tail, Jerry good-naturedly expressed his disinclination.
I have resolved every night, when I am not imperatively occupied by my duties, to record, as nearly as possible in his own words, what he has related during the day.
"D'ye get that?" Billy repeated, more imperatively.
Her sense of her own importance imperatively urged her to prove that she was not a person who could be deceived with impunity.