imperiality

imperiality

(ɪmˌpɪərɪˈælɪtɪ)
n
the state of being imperial
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References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include imperiality, deep time, and indigenous landmark epistemologies in North America; early Christian martyrology, imperial thirdspace, and mimicry; and temporal and spatial displacement: German and Russian persons, names, and cities in K|nigsburg/Kaliningrad.
His research focuses on the Imperiality of Power and Geopolitical Memory.
(25) Kill fetuses (26) and burn the flag, (27) but pervies get immunity, (28) In place of liberty and law there is imperiality. A judge says this, a judge says that, opinions of whole cloth are made, All courts have FORCE, all courts have WILL, (29) neutrality's a masquerade.
At the centre of the DMS is what David Slater termed "imperiality of knowledge" that is constituted by "interweaving of geopolitical power, knowledge and subordinating representation of the other" (Slater 2004: 223).
For instance, consider what in my previous writings (Tamdgidi 2006 (4)), I have argued for regarding the value of considering a typology of imperiality in a world-history context, identifying the modern (economic) form as only one form among a trilogy of political, cultural, and economic modes of imperiality appearing in world-history.
Should not a liberating philosophy be able to help us become aware of not only actual, but also potential modes of imperiality that may still lurk behind seemingly "antisystemic movements" challenging the Western status quo at the present?
I can very well give to French imperiality many other signifiers besides a Negro's salute: a French general pins a decoration on a one-armed Senegalese, a nun hands a cup of tea to a bed-ridden Arab, a white school-master teaches attentive piccaninnies: the press undertakes every day to demonstrate that the store of mythical signifiers is inexhaustible.
The case for Britain and Britishness lies, Schwyzer argues, in the fact that the three virtues celebrated and nostalgically desired by Tudor writers were all peculiarly British: insularity, antiquity, and imperiality. Not until the seventeenth century, Schwyzer suggests, would an English nationalism celebratory of the English language, racial descent from the Anglo-Saxons, and parliamentary and legal traditions and privileges emerge.
Russell's essay on "Time Before and After The Time Machine" belongs, it seems to me, more with Part 2--"Currents of Its Time: Neoteny, Anthropology, Society, Numerology, Imperiality"--than with Part 1's rubric of "Eternal Readability." Russell traces Wells's familiarity with theories of time, and his proleptic relation to Einstein's and other contemporaries' revolutionary theories of relative time; Russell is less interested in the universals of Wells's text than in its extraordinary time-lines.
In this case, then, the myth of French imperiality empties the picture's meaning of whatever history and value it may have apart from myth, on "its own" ("it belongs," he says, "to a history ...
Perhaps building on Aime Cesaire's understanding of the Western imperiality as a poison spreading throughout the world, the best example is the West's view of itself, as its most central significations of itself are those of benevolence and innocence.