imperious


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imperious

tyrannical; despotic; arrogant; dictatorial; overbearing: behaving in an imperious way; urgent; imperative: an imperious requirement
Not to be confused with:
imperial – relating to an empire, emperor, or empress: an imperial ruler; regal; outstanding in quality
imperil – risk, jeopardize, hazard, chance; to put in peril or danger: imperil the safe outcome of an action
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

im·pe·ri·ous

 (ĭm-pîr′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Arrogantly domineering or overbearing. See Synonyms at dictatorial.
2. Urgent; pressing: an imperious necessity.
3. Obsolete Regal; imperial.

[From Latin imperiōsus, from imperium, imperium; see empire.]

im·pe′ri·ous·ly adv.
im·pe′ri·ous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

imperious

(ɪmˈpɪərɪəs)
adj
1. domineering; arrogant; overbearing
2. rare urgent; imperative
[C16: from Latin imperiōsus from imperium command, power]
imˈperiously adv
imˈperiousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•pe•ri•ous

(ɪmˈpɪər i əs)

adj.
1. domineering in a haughty manner; dictatorial.
2. urgent; imperative: imperious need.
[1535–45; < Latin imperiōsus commanding, tyrannical =imperi(um) imperium + -ōsus -ous]
im•pe′ri•ous•ly, adv.
im•pe′ri•ous•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imperious - having or showing arrogant superiority to and disdain of those one views as unworthy; "some economists are disdainful of their colleagues in other social disciplines"; "haughty aristocrats"; "his lordly manners were offensive"; "walked with a prideful swagger"; "very sniffy about breaches of etiquette"; "his mother eyed my clothes with a supercilious air"; "a more swaggering mood than usual"- W.L.Shirer
proud - feeling self-respect or pleasure in something by which you measure your self-worth; or being a reason for pride; "proud parents"; "proud of his accomplishments"; "a proud moment"; "proud to serve his country"; "a proud name"; "proud princes"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

imperious

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

imperious

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُتَعَجْرِف، مُتَجَبِّر
pánovitý
myndig
parancsoló
hrokafullur; ráîríkur
arogantiškumasįsakmus
kategoriskspavēlniecisksvaldonīgs
buyurucuemreden

imperious

[ɪmˈpɪərɪəs] ADJ [tone, manner] → imperioso; (= urgent) → apremiante
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

imperious

[ɪmˈpɪəriəs] adjimpérieux/euse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

imperious

adj, imperiously
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

imperious

[ɪmˈpɪərɪəs] adjimperioso/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

imperious

(imˈpiəriəs) adjective
proud, behaving as if expecting to be obeyed. an imperious manner.
imˈperiousness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Circumstances of an imperious nature, which it is unnecessary to relate here, had prevented him from taking service with that gallant army which had fought the disastrous campaigns ending with the fall of Corinth, and he chafed under the inglorious restraint, longing for the release of his energies, the larger life of the soldier, the opportunity for distinction.
Hence Quasimodo's gratitude was profound, passionate, boundless; and although the visage of his adopted father was often clouded or severe, although his speech was habitually curt, harsh, imperious, that gratitude never wavered for a single moment.
She made an awkward, imperious little bow as she went in.
Aronnax," he said, in rather an imperious tone, "I require you to keep one of the conditions that bind you to me."
The next day at three o'clock we were again at the door, and the footmen as before; we heard the silk dress rustle and the lady came down the steps, and in an imperious voice she said, "York, you must put those horses' heads higher; they are not fit to be seen."
They often appear disposed to exert an imperious control over the other departments; and as they commonly have the people on their side, they always act with such momentum as to make it very difficult for the other members of the government to maintain the balance of the Constitution.
The imperious voices of hunger and thirst prevailed over my dread.
When I live at Auteuil, you must come there, as you belong to my service." Bertuccio hung down his head before the imperious look of his master, and remained motionless, without making any answer.
This penetrating look, this imperious expression of the whole countenance generally disturbed those to whom the prince spoke, more than either majesty or regular beauty could have done in the conqueror of Rocroy.
He, who was sheer bladed steel in the imperious flashing of his will, could swashbuckle and bully like any over-seas roisterer, or wheedle as wickedly winningly as the first woman out of Eden or the last woman of that descent.
Soon he came to a parting of the ways; leading from the highway was a road less traveled, having the appearance, indeed, of having been long abandoned, because, he thought, it led to something evil; yet he turned into it without hesitation, impelled by some imperious necessity.
Levin saw proofs of this in his dress, in the old-fashioned threadbare coat, obviously not his everyday attire, in his shrewd deep-set eyes, in his idiomatic, fluent Russian, in the imperious tone that had become habitual from long use, and in the resolute gestures of his large, red, sunburnt hands, with an old betrothal ring on the little finger.