imperishability


Also found in: Thesaurus.

im·per·ish·a·ble

 (ĭm-pĕr′ĭ-shə-bəl)
adj.
Not perishable: imperishable food; imperishable hopes.

im·per′ish·a·bil′i·ty, im·per′ish·a·ble·ness n.
im·per′ish·a·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imperishability - the property of being resistant to decay; "he advertised the imperishability of the product"
permanence, permanency - the property of being able to exist for an indefinite duration
References in periodicals archive ?
(121) The theologians thus identify a separate [phrase omitted] that lends the imperishable things their imperishability. But, Aristotle is quick to point out, the gods eat this [phrase omitted] for the sake of pleasure, not for sustenance; and, even if the latter were the case, it would indicate that the gods are mortal, and not immortal.
From left to right, the symbols are fihankra--the household (safety, Security); mate masie or ntesie--I have heard and kept it (symbol of confidentiality); Nyame biribi wo soro--There is something in the heavens (symbol of hope in God's providence); bye woaenhye--unburnable (symbol of imperishability of the human soul); Gye Nyame--God is the answer, or except God; Nyame dua--God's alter (symbol of the presence of God); pempamsie--preparedness (symbol of steadfastness, readiness to serve); dweninmmezn--the sign of a lamb (humility and divinity); Ohene Aniwa--the King's eyes (symbol of vigilance and watchfulness); and adwo-Calmness (symbol of peace).
memories; for it indicates that the feeling of imperishability, which
Malraux employs the cosmos as an allusion to overemphasize the irrationality of the human condition, differentiating the untroubled imperishability of the former with the chaotic impermanence of the latter.
Riven by greed, ignorance and a belief in the imperishability of the market, our civilization is collapsing as we tunnel underneath it with the hope of escaping the worst of its hubris.
Roth exposes the vanity of the wish for imperishability by the logic of narrative juxtaposition; the novel immediately returns to the brutal realism of the framing memory, of "upright shovels with their blades in [a] large pile of earth to one side of the grave" (57).
I'm about to put on imperishability. In an instant, in the twinkling of an eye.
We historians know that our work lacks the imperishability of great art.