impermanent


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

im·per·ma·nent

 (ĭm-pûr′mə-nənt)
adj.
Not lasting or durable; not permanent.

im·per′ma·nence, im·per′ma·nen·cy n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

impermanent

(ɪmˈpɜːmənənt)
adj
not permanent; fleeting; transitory
imˈpermanence, imˈpermanency n
imˈpermanently adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•per•ma•nent

(ɪmˈpɜr mə nənt)

adj.
not permanent; transitory.
[1645–55]
im•per′ma•nence, n.
im•per′ma•nent•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.impermanent - not permanent; not lasting; "politics is an impermanent factor of life"- James Thurber; "impermanent palm cottages"; "a temperary arrangement"; "temporary housing"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"
lasting, permanent - continuing or enduring without marked change in status or condition or place; "permanent secretary to the president"; "permanent address"; "literature of permanent value"
2.impermanent - existing or enduring for a limited time only
finite - bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

impermanent

adjective temporary, passing, brief, fleeting, elusive, mortal, short-lived, flying, fugitive, transient, momentary, ephemeral, transitory, perishable, fly-by-night (informal), evanescent, inconstant, fugacious, here today, gone tomorrow (informal) Looking at the sky reminds me how impermanent we all are.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

impermanent

adjective
Intended, used, or present for a limited time:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

impermanent

[ɪmˈpɜːmənənt] ADJimpermanente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

impermanent

adjunbeständig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

impermanent

[ɪmˈpɜːmənənt] adjtransitorio/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Unesco notes, 'The site is the only area in the Philippines where traditional architecture is of stone in response to the wind and monsoon stresses rather than of the more typical, tropical, impermanent materials (wood, bamboo, thatch) commonly used in village architecture.'
She added: "I have just been past them, and to prove how water-based and impermanent the dyes are, where it has rained overnight the sheep are a lot less pink today."
He said that the state's institutions should be independent and strong as the government was impermanent not the institutions.
Barrister Murtaza Wahab said that the state's institutions should be independent and strong as the government was impermanent not the institutions.
Gloria's life, like most, is full of impermanent connections and stabs at self-improvement.
He said that because WhatsApp is a secure messaging platform, it ultimately represents the "future of communication," where a user can be sure that whatever he says is both protected and impermanent.
Montinola Grant, Liv Vinluan presents a monument both permanent and impermanent, transforming something as fragile as paper into a three-dimensional structure.
The aesthetic is sometimes described as one of beauty that is 'imperfect, impermanent and incomplete.' It is a view of life that acknowledges three simple realities: nothing lasts, nothing is finished and nothing is perfect.' It is beauty or serenity that comes with age when the life of the object and its impermanence are evidenced in its patina and wear, or in any visible repairs.
'One of his popular teachings was that wealth does not guarantee happiness and that wealth is impermanent.
Uralic Essive and the Expression of Impermanent State.
The proposal would render policies passed inside megabills as impermanent as the appropriations they contain.