impermeable

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im·per·me·a·ble

 (ĭm-pûr′mē-ə-bəl)
adj.
Impossible to permeate: an impermeable membrane; an impermeable border.

im·per′me·a·bil′i·ty, im·per′me·a·ble·ness n.
im·per′me·a·bly adv.

impermeable

(ɪmˈpɜːmɪəbəl)
adj
(Chemistry) (of a substance) not allowing the passage of a fluid through interstices; not permeable
imˌpermeaˈbility, imˈpermeableness n
imˈpermeably adv

im•per•me•a•ble

(ɪmˈpɜr mi ə bəl)

adj.
1. not permeable; impassable.
2. (of porous substances, rocks, etc.) not permitting the passage of a fluid.
[1690–1700; < Late Latin]
im•per`me•a•bil′i•ty, im•per′me•a•ble•ness, n.
im•per′me•a•bly, adv.

im·per·me·a·ble

(ĭm-pûr′mē-ə-bəl)
Relating to a material through which substances, such as liquids or gases, cannot pass: an impermeable cell wall.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.impermeable - preventing especially liquids to pass or diffuse through; "impermeable stone"; "an impermeable layer of scum"; "a coat impermeable to rain"
tight - of such close construction as to be impermeable; "a tight roof"; "warm in our tight little house"
imperviable, impervious - not admitting of passage or capable of being affected; "a material impervious to water"; "someone impervious to argument"
permeable - allowing fluids or gases to pass or diffuse through; "permeable membranes"; "rock that is permeable by water"

impermeable

adjective impenetrable, resistant, impervious, waterproof, impassable, hermetic, nonporous The canoe is made from an impermeable wood.
Translations

impermeable

[ɪmˈpɜːmɪəbl] ADJimpermeable (to a)

impermeable

adjundurchlässig, impermeabel (spec)

impermeable

[ɪmˈpɜːmɪəbl] adj (frm) → impermeabile

im·per·me·a·ble

a. impermeable, impenetrable, que no deja pasar líquidos.
References in periodicals archive ?
2014) evaluated the long-term thermal performance of impermeably faced polyisocyanurate (polyiso) insulation.
There is a Cartesian geography (Herman, "Re-Minding" 254) underlying this view, which assumes that the mind is confined within internal boundaries, impermeably detached from the world (and the paper, which is in the world).
Beyond the fact that cultures are not impermeably bounded units, argues Tanner, their internal dynamics are also never characterized by full-fledged consensus, univocal agreement, or monistic value dispersion.