impetigo


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im·pe·ti·go

 (ĭm′pĭ-tī′gō)
n.
A contagious skin infection, usually of children, that is caused by staphylococcal or streptococcal bacteria and is marked by superficial pustules and thick yellow crusts, commonly on the face.

[Middle English, from Latin impetīgō, from impetere, to attack; see impetus.]

im′pe·tig′e·nous (-tĭj′ə-nəs) adj.

impetigo

(ˌɪmpɪˈtaɪɡəʊ)
n
(Pathology) a contagious bacterial skin disease characterized by the formation of pustules that develop into yellowish crusty sores
[C16: from Latin: scabby eruption, from impetere to assail; see impetus; for form, compare vertigo]
impetiginous adj

im•pe•ti•go

(ˌɪm pɪˈtaɪ goʊ)

n.
a contagious skin infection, usu. streptococcal, characterized by pustules that erupt and form crusts.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin impetīgō=impet(ere) to make for, attack (see impetus) + -īgō, as in vertīgō vertigo]
im`pe•tig′i•nous (-ˈtɪdʒ ə nəs) adj.

im·pe·ti·go

(ĭm′pĭ-tī′gō)
A contagious disease often affecting children, characterized by the formation of pimples and thick yellow crusts on the skin.

impetigo

A skin infection characterized by raised, blister-like lesions, especially around the nose and mouth. These lesions rupture and form a yellowish crust.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impetigo - a very contagious infection of the skinimpetigo - a very contagious infection of the skin; common in children; localized redness develops into small blisters that gradually crust and erode
disease of the skin, skin disease, skin disorder - a disease affecting the skin
Translations

impetigo

[ˌɪmpɪˈtaɪgəʊ] Nimpétigo m

impetigo

n (Med) → Eiterflechte f, → Impetigo f

impetigo

[ˌɪmpɪˈtaɪgəʊ] n (Med) → impetigine f

im·pe·ti·go

n. impétigo, infección bacteriana de la piel que se caracteriza por pústulas dolorosas de tamaño diferente que al desecarse forman costras amarillentas;
___ contagiosa___ contagioso;
___ neonatorum___ del neonato;
___ vulgaris___ vulgar.

impetigo

n impétigo
References in periodicals archive ?
One skin infection is called impetigo (im-pih-TIE-go).
Fe'i gelwid yn 'pink precipitate' ac fe'i defnyddiwyd i drin y cyflwr 'impetigo'.
Many diseases are contagious and the source of infection can be microorganisms lurking in the 'spot' and transmitted by spreading the contents, such as in impetigo (where bacteria are spread), or warts (where viruses are released).
When present in large quantities, they can be responsible for outbreaks of stomach and skin complaints, vomiting and infections such as toxic shock syndrome and impetigo.
Those approved in 2007 included two HIV therapies; four oncology products; two antihypertensives; one antibiotic; and one NME each to treat Parkinson's disease, pulmonary hypertension, impetigo, acromegaly, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and phenylketonuria.
The second half covers clinical examples, these include: infective skin diseases such as impetigo and eczema herpeticum; epidermolysis bullosa; Stevens-Johnson syndrome; and urticaria.
Sufferers from dermatitis, eczema, psoriasis, impetigo, or any other skin complaint, even if they have Riven up all hope oi: a cure, should try D.D.D.
Q MY daughter has just gone back to nursery and has developed impetigo. Is this a dangerous condition and what are the complications?
Getting a tattoo puts you at risk of serious infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, tetanus, dermatitis, impetigo, flare ups of existing eczema, allergic reactions and thick scars called keloids.
Infections such as tinea and impetigo may stigmatize children and their family due to their communicability and appearance.
The itchy bites can be scratched open by children, leading to scabbing, scarring, and the skin infection impetigo. As with many medical problems, prevention is the best strategy.
A topical antibiotic approved for treatment of impetigo caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes in patients aged 9 months and older.