impingement syndrome


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impingement syndrome

n.
A group of symptoms in the shoulder including progressive pain and impaired function, resulting from inflammation of or injury to the rotator cuff that causes encroachment by surrounding bony structures and ligaments, such as the acromion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS), or "dancer's heel," and tendinopathy of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL tendinopathy), or "dancer's tendinitis," are common in dancers.
Variations of acromion has been associated with sub acromial impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tear.
Shoulder function and 3-dimensional scapular kinematics in people with and without shoulder impingement syndrome.
Shoulder impingement syndrome among competitive swimmers in India--Prevalence, evaluation and risk factors.
sup][2] We report a patient with both snapping hip and iliopsoas tendon impingement syndrome successfully treated with arthroscopic release.
15], thus predisposing the drivers to secondary impingement syndrome.
The repetitive plantarflexion motion of the ankle during sport and the increased stresses placed on the posterior aspect of the ankle are believed to be the causes of impingement syndrome.
Tendon thinning usually results in impingement syndrome since normal thickness of the supraspinatus tendon ranges 4.
Guidelines from the Washington State Department of Labor and Industry state that patients who should undergo isolated subacromial decompression (with or without acromioplasty) need to have documented subacromial impingement syndrome with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of rotator cuff tendonopathy or tear, have undergone 12 weeks of conservative therapy (including at least active assisted range of motion and home-based exercises), and have had a subacromial injection with a local anesthetic that has provided documented relief of pain.
Among the topics are a practical guide to shoulder magnetic resonance imaging, glenohumeral joint and capsular gross anatomy, shoulder impingement syndrome, glenohumeral joint instability, and shoulder-related pathology including paralabral cysts and biceps tendon.
5 in Annals of Internal Medicine, 104 people, ages 18 to 65, with shoulder impingement syndrome (shoulder bursitis or rotator cuff tendinitis) received either twice-weekly physical therapy for three weeks or as many as three steroid injections given over a year.