implant

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im·plant

 (ĭm-plănt′)
v. im·plant·ed, im·plant·ing, im·plants
v.tr.
1. To set in firmly, as into the ground: implant fence posts.
2. To establish securely, as in the mind or consciousness; instill: habits that had been implanted early in childhood.
3. Medicine
a. To insert or embed (an object or a device) surgically: implant a drug capsule; implant a pacemaker.
b. To graft or insert (a tissue) within the body.
v.intr. Embryology
To become attached to and embedded in the uterine lining. Used of a fertilized egg.
n. (ĭm′plănt′)
Something implanted, especially a surgically implanted tissue or device: a dental implant; a subcutaneous implant.

[Middle English implanten, from Medieval Latin implantāre : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin plantāre, to plant (from planta, a shoot; see plant).]

im·plant′a·ble adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

implant

vb (tr)
1. to establish firmly; inculcate; instil: to implant sound moral principles.
2. to plant or embed; infix; entrench
3. (Surgery) surgery
a. to graft (a tissue) into the body
b. to insert (a radioactive substance, hormone, etc) into the tissues
n
(Surgery) anything implanted, esp surgically, such as a tissue graft or hormone
imˈplanter n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•plant

(v. ɪmˈplænt, -ˈplɑnt; n. ˈɪmˌplænt, -ˌplɑnt)

v.t.
1. to establish firmly in the mind: to implant principles of behavior.
2. to plant securely: to implant a post in the soil.
3. to insert or graft (a tissue, organ, or inert substance) into the body.
n.
4.
a. a device or material used for repairing or replacing part of the body.
b. medication or radioactive material inserted into tissue for sustained therapy.
5.
a. a frame or support inserted permanently into the bone or soft tissue of the jaw to hold artificial teeth.
b. an artificial tooth or bridge attached to such a device.
[1535–45; (<French) < Late Latin]
im•plant′a•ble, adj.
im•plant′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

implant


Past participle: implanted
Gerund: implanting

Imperative
implant
implant
Present
I implant
you implant
he/she/it implants
we implant
you implant
they implant
Preterite
I implanted
you implanted
he/she/it implanted
we implanted
you implanted
they implanted
Present Continuous
I am implanting
you are implanting
he/she/it is implanting
we are implanting
you are implanting
they are implanting
Present Perfect
I have implanted
you have implanted
he/she/it has implanted
we have implanted
you have implanted
they have implanted
Past Continuous
I was implanting
you were implanting
he/she/it was implanting
we were implanting
you were implanting
they were implanting
Past Perfect
I had implanted
you had implanted
he/she/it had implanted
we had implanted
you had implanted
they had implanted
Future
I will implant
you will implant
he/she/it will implant
we will implant
you will implant
they will implant
Future Perfect
I will have implanted
you will have implanted
he/she/it will have implanted
we will have implanted
you will have implanted
they will have implanted
Future Continuous
I will be implanting
you will be implanting
he/she/it will be implanting
we will be implanting
you will be implanting
they will be implanting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been implanting
you have been implanting
he/she/it has been implanting
we have been implanting
you have been implanting
they have been implanting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been implanting
you will have been implanting
he/she/it will have been implanting
we will have been implanting
you will have been implanting
they will have been implanting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been implanting
you had been implanting
he/she/it had been implanting
we had been implanting
you had been implanting
they had been implanting
Conditional
I would implant
you would implant
he/she/it would implant
we would implant
you would implant
they would implant
Past Conditional
I would have implanted
you would have implanted
he/she/it would have implanted
we would have implanted
you would have implanted
they would have implanted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.implant - a prosthesis placed permanently in tissueimplant - a prosthesis placed permanently in tissue
artificial heart - a pump that replaces the natural heart
artificial joint - a metal or plastic part that is surgically implanted to replace a natural joint (possibly elbow or wrist but usually hip or knee)
breast implant - an implant for cosmetic purposes to replace a breast that has been surgically removed
dental implant - an implant that replaces a natural tooth
heart valve - an implant that replaces a natural cardiac valve
interocular lens implant, IOL, lens implant - a clear plastic lens that is implanted in the eye; usually done when the natural lens has been removed in a cataract operation
penile implant - an implant that creates an artificial erection
prosthesis, prosthetic device - corrective consisting of a replacement for a part of the body
shunt - implant consisting of a tube made of plastic or rubber; for draining fluids within the body
Verb1.implant - fix or set securely or deeply; "He planted a knee in the back of his opponent"; "The dentist implanted a tooth in the gum"
infix, insert, introduce, enter - put or introduce into something; "insert a picture into the text"
pot - plant in a pot; "He potted the palm"
nest - fit together or fit inside; "nested bowls"
bury, sink - embed deeply; "She sank her fingers into the soft sand"; "He buried his head in her lap"
2.implant - become attached to and embedded in the uterus; "The egg fertilized in vitro implanted in the uterus of the birth mother with no further complications"
attach - become attached; "The spider's thread attached to the window sill"
3.implant - put firmly in the mind; "Plant a thought in the students' minds"
communicate, pass along, put across, pass on, pass - transmit information ; "Please communicate this message to all employees"; "pass along the good news"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

implant

verb
1. insert, place, plant, fix, root, sow, graft, embed, ingraft Doctors have implanted an artificial heart into a 46-year-old man.
2. instil, sow, infuse, inculcate, infix His father had implanted in him an ambition to obtain an education.
noun
1. implantation, insert They felt a woman had the right to have a breast implant.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

implant

verb
To fix (an idea, for example) in someone's mind by reemphasis and repetition:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَزْرَع في جِسْم الإنْسانيَغْرُس، يَزْرَع
implantovatvštípit
bibringeimplantereindpode
istuttaajuurruttaakiinnittääkiinnittyä
græîa íinnræta, innprenta
įsodinimasįsodintiįteigtipersodinimaspersodinti
iedvestimplantēt
implantovať
aklına sokmakaşılamak

implant

[ˈɪmplɑːnt]
A. Nimplante m
B. [ɪmˈplɑːnt] VT (Med) [+ organ, tissue] → injertar, implantar (fig) [+ idea, principle] → inculcar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

implant

[ɪmˈplɑːnt]
vt
[+ embryo, organ] → implanter
(fig) [+ idea, ideal] → inculquer
[ˈɪmplɑːnt] nimplant m breast implant
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

implant

vt
(fig)einimpfen (in sb jdm); to be deeply implanted in somebody(tief) in jdm verwurzelt sein
vi (Med: in womb) → sich einnisten
n (Med) → Implantat nt; breast implantBrustimplantat nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

implant

[vb ɪmˈplɑːnt; n ˈɪmplɑːnt]
1. vt (Med) → innestare (fig) (idea, principle) → inculcare
2. n (Med) → innesto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

implant

(imˈplaːnt) verb
1. to put (ideas etc) into a person's mind.
2. to put (eg human tissue, a device etc) permanently into a part of the body.
implanˈtation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

im·plant

n. implante, cualquier material insertado o injertado en el cuerpo;
v. implantar, injertar, insertar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

implant

n implante m; breast — implante mamario; cochlear — implante coclear; silicone — implante de silicona; vt implantar
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
He is lively, and seems clever, and when I have inspired him with greater respect for me than his sister's kind offices have implanted, he may be an agreeable flirt.
But to represent the Almighty as avenging the sins of the guilty on the innocent, was indecent, if not blasphemous, as it was to represent him acting against the first principles of natural justice, and against the original notions of right and wrong, which he himself had implanted in our minds; by which we were to judge not only in all matters which were not revealed, but even of the truth of revelation itself.
First, the instinct of imitation is implanted in man from childhood, one difference between him and other animals being that he is the most imitative of living creatures, and through imitation learns his earliest lessons; and no less universal is the pleasure felt in things imitated.
Lecount's one weak point, if she has such a thing at all, is a taste for science, implanted by her deceased husband, the professor.
In spite of their increased intelligence and the tendency of their animal instincts to reawaken, they had certain fixed ideas implanted by Moreau in their minds, which absolutely bounded their imaginations.
The life and character I have found portrayed there have appealed always to the consciousness of right and wrong implanted in me; and from no one has this appeal been stronger than from George Eliot.
My first impulse was to await darkness before attempting to cross the plain, so deeply implanted are habits of thought; but of a sudden I recollected the perpetual noonday brilliance which envelopes Pellucidar, and with a smile I stepped forth into the day-light.
And yet the germ he had implanted must be at work; he was confident of that, though he was without confidence as to the result.
And blind fear descended upon Michael, the fear that is implanted in all animals and in man himself--THE FEAR OF THE TRAP.
It took twenty years to implant that desire; and for ten years more that desire has grown.
Stop thief!' There is a passion FOR HUNTING SOMETHING deeply implanted in the human breast.
And whereas the other so-called virtues of the soul seem to be akin to bodily qualities, for even when they are not originally innate they can be implanted later by habit and exercise, the of wisdom more than anything else contains a divine element which always remains, and by this conversion is rendered useful and profitable; or, on the other hand, hurtful and useless.