implicature


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im·plic·a·ture

 (ĭm-plĭk′ə-chər)
n. Linguistics
1. The aspect of meaning that a speaker conveys, implies, or suggests without directly expressing. Although the utterance "Can you pass the salt?" is literally a request for information about one's ability to pass salt, the understood implicature is a request for salt.
2. The process by which such a meaning is conveyed, implied, or suggested. In saying "Some dogs are mammals," the speaker conveys by implicature that not all dogs are mammals.

implicature

(ɪmˈplɪkətʃə)
n
1. (Logic) a proposition inferred from the circumstances of utterances of another proposition rather than from its literal meaning, as when an academic referee writes the candidate's handwriting is excellent to convey that he has nothing relevant to commend
2. (Logic) the relation between the uttered and the inferred statement
References in periodicals archive ?
Some other scholars claim that Frege's concept of coloring is a precursor to Grice's notion of conventional implicature. This paper argues that both of these claims are mistaken.
(15.) Note that in this respect, we follow Grice (1989: 32) in thinking of irony and sarcasm as a case of conversational implicature, and hence as possessing a level of meaning distinct from the conventional meanings a sentence expresses (see also Bach, 1994: 140; Huang, 2007: 34).
There is an implicature too which suggests that the noun "Benazir" is equivalent to the noun "Revolution".
Besides the basic concepts from semiotics, in our analysis we will also make use of the concept of implicature, a term used in pragmatics.
"Presupposition and Conversational Implicature." Studies in the Way of Words, Harvard UP, 1989, pp.
From a general point of view, the phenomena studied by pragmatics ranges from very language context--dependent ones, such as deixis (person, space, time and social deixis, vocative), to less dependent on the structure of the language phenomena such as implicature, or presupposition.
Sometimes the meaning implied by the context is referred to as an implicature. (116)
Chapter 2 deals with speech acts, while chapter three deals with reference, inference and implicature, including Grice's conversational implicature.
So let us cancel that implicature: Probability is a very weak objective reason for Carla to take the pill.
"Truth-Conditional Content and Conversational Implicature." The Semantics/Pragmatics Distinction, edited by Claudia Bianchi, CSLI Publications, 2004, pp.