implicature

(redirected from implicatures)

im·plic·a·ture

 (ĭm-plĭk′ə-chər)
n. Linguistics
1. The aspect of meaning that a speaker conveys, implies, or suggests without directly expressing. Although the utterance "Can you pass the salt?" is literally a request for information about one's ability to pass salt, the understood implicature is a request for salt.
2. The process by which such a meaning is conveyed, implied, or suggested. In saying "Some dogs are mammals," the speaker conveys by implicature that not all dogs are mammals.

implicature

(ɪmˈplɪkətʃə)
n
1. (Logic) a proposition inferred from the circumstances of utterances of another proposition rather than from its literal meaning, as when an academic referee writes the candidate's handwriting is excellent to convey that he has nothing relevant to commend
2. (Logic) the relation between the uttered and the inferred statement
References in periodicals archive ?
The readers expect the narrator to conduct his "conversation" along Gricean "felicity" conditions, including what Bortolussi and Dixon call narratorial implicatures, "inferences licensed by the assumption that the narrator is cooperative" (73).
Digressions in argumentative discourse: Multiple goals, standing concerns, and implicatures. In K.
But has the same truth conditions and probability of truth as and; however, it has assertability conditions (assertibility, in his terminology) whose mastery can be exhibited by speakers' ability to say when it is right to use but rather than and: it conveys implicatures in addition to truth conditions.
Whenever your theory seems to be wrong because it is omitting a certain truth condition--as Fraction's theory of "S knows that P" seems to wrongly neglect to include a condition to the effect that P must be true for a sentence ascribing knowledge of P to a subject to be true--you can simply claim that assertions of the sentences in question generate implicatures to the effect that the condition in question holds.
The simplicity of the original disappears because the translator multiplies the lexical items used to refer to the same reality and constantly enlarges the text in order to make explicit the implicatures (6) he sees behind the original text.
Their topics include whether entailments can be implicatures, trying to make sense of embedded conversational implicatures, negotiating what is said in the face of miscommunication, accommodation in linguistic interaction: on the so-called triggering problem, expressive meanings and expressive commitments: a case of meaning as use, and temperate semantic conventionalism.
The at-issue content is the truth-conditional content (what is said); the not-at-issue content may include presuppositional content, conventional implicatures, and so forth.
They argue that narrow-scope negation pertains just to the proposition expressed by the corresponding affirmative sentence and does not affect conventional implicatures while wide-scope negation pertains to the total meaning of its target sentence, ignoring the distinction between truth conditions and conventional implicatures.
Firstly, some key aspects of pragmatics that are used in the analysis are described: speech acts, implicatures and lexicalized tropic inferences (formulas, routines, etc.) (1) and the studies that focus on this referred to.
But that departure does not distinguish legal interpretive rules from other implicatures. Legal interpretive rules also lead words written in the language of the law to be given different meanings than they would if written in ordinary language.