impossibilism

(redirected from impossibilists)

impossibilism

(ɪmˈpɒsɪbəlɪzəm)
n
1. (Sociology) sociol a socialist interpretation suggesting that reforms are generally impossible and that revolutionary action is the only way to bring about socialism
2. (Art Terms) art a small art movement focusing on objects, such as three-dimensional objects in two-dimensional spaces that disobey the laws of logic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

impossibilism

a defeatist attitude; the belief that all things are impossible.
See also: Attitudes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The impossibilists on the other side are going: 'well of course they hate you, but you should hate them too and try to overthrow them'."
"The impossibilists would have stuck to their guns and rejected the idea of charging a fee, which would have caused all sorts of problems, and potentially opened up local government in Merthyr to worse conditions.
Miss Farr, and the rest of the Impossibilists. Their commercial defeat has been slaughterous: each scaling party has gained the rampart only to be hurled back into the moat with empty pockets.
For SPC Jack McDonald see Peter Newell, The Impossibilists: A Brief Profile of the Socialist Party of Canada (London 2008), 185-88, 192-93, 208-09; Kerry Taylor, "'Jack' McDonald: A Canadian Revolutionary in New Zealand," Labour/Le Travail, 32 (Fall 1993), 261-68; San Francisco Chronicle, 6 July 1968.
In theory an "impossibilist" party that rejected the advocacy of reforms because they caused workers to question the need to overthrow the capitalist System, in practice the members it elected to the British Columbia legislature prior to World War I supported a number of reforms of benefit to the working class.
He disdainfully dismissed the left wing of the Socialist Party as a bunch of "impossibilists." In a letter to his friend Morris Hillquit, a New York Socialist, he called them worse than useless: "They are the men who have spent their time in theorizing until they have absolutely ruined themselves for all practical purposes." (14)
The party's left wing--Harriman's "impossibilists'--believed that supporting non-Socialist reforms or candidates would water down the party's message and undermine its commitment to the ultimate triumph of socialism.
Heaps, impatient with mere theorizing and the "paralysis of analysis" of the doctrinaire socialists, as well as the so-called "impossibilists" (who claimed to be "in tune with the infinite") split from the SPC.
If it is certain that impossibilities can be believed, then the impossibilists already have their trousers half-way down.
Impossibilists grant that people often act as if they believe impossibilities.
Impossibilists try to keep up appearances by distinguishing between what people really believe and what they believe they believe.
One of the early impossibilists, George Berkeley (1710, 273), paraphrases apparent belief in terms of what we imagine we believe.