impoundment


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im·pound·ment

 (ĭm-pound′mənt)
n.
1. The act of impounding or the state of being impounded.
2. A body of water, such as a reservoir, made by impounding.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

im•pound•ment

(ɪmˈpaʊnd mənt)

also im•pound′age,



n.
1. the act of impounding or the state of being impounded.
2. a confined body of water, as a reservoir.
[1655–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

impoundage, impoundment

the process of taking into legal custody, especially property. — impounder, n.
See also: Property and Ownership
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impoundment - placing private property in the custody of an officer of the law
seizure - the taking possession of something by legal process
drug bust, drugs bust - seizure of illegal drugs by the police
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

impoundment

[ɪmˈpaʊndmənt] N (US) (Fin) → embargo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(7) If these properties lose their frontage as the impoundment waters recede to the original contours of the stream, then the relevant issue is what occupies the land formerly submerged in water.
One active site, a site downstream of the active impoundment and two recently abandoned beaver dam sites were chosen as study sites.
Kayla had her own diagnosis: the coal processing plant and sludge impoundment operated by subsidiaries of Massey Energy that loom right above the school.
Regardless of your government's level of involvement, you should be aware that the maintenance and operation of your impoundment should be an integral part of your organization's risk management program.
That impoundment of water and the material it carries is affecting the food chain in the East China Sea, one of the world's largest fisheries, says Louis A.
The new law "adds automobile impoundment and seizure to the list of acceptable 'alcohol-impaired driving countermeasures' eligible for federal grant money....
The enclosed stretch of tidal water -known as an "impoundment area" -would lie a mile off Kinmel Bay and Rhyl.
Impoundment. Up to 1974, presidents enjoyed a power known as impoundment: if a president didn't think an appropriation was appropriate, he didn't spend the earmarked money.
Within six hours, 300 million gallons of thick sludge had flooded out of the Big Branch Refuse Impoundment, a hilltop facility owned by Martin County Coal, and into two tributaries of the Big Sandy River, which courses along the Kentucky-West Virginia border before emptying into the Ohio River.
Impoundment of natural watercourses results in direct loss of species-rich riparian habitats, and fragmentation of remaining forest patches.
Release date- 15082019 - Aiming to protect the communities and reduce the impact on the environment, Vale is carrying out three impoundment projects in areas downstream of the dams: Sul Superior (Barao de Cocais), B3/B4 (community at Macacos, in Nova Lima), and in the flood spot of Forquilha I, II, III, IV and Grupo dams.