impound

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im·pound

 (ĭm-pound′)
tr.v. im·pound·ed, im·pound·ing, im·pounds
1. To confine in or as if in a pound: capture and impound stray dogs.
2. To place (something) in legal custody until a dispute involving it is decided: impounding ballots in a disputed election.
3. To set aside in a fund rather than spend as prescribed: a governor who impounded monies designated for use by cities.
4. To accumulate and store in a reservoir: By damming the stream, the engineers impounded its waters for irrigation.
n. (ĭm′pound′)
1. A place where impounded property is stored, as a lot for keeping vehicles that have been towed by police order.
2. The process or activity of impounding something: the impound of the uninsured car.

im·pound′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

impound

(ɪmˈpaʊnd)
vb (tr)
1. to confine (stray animals, illegally parked cars, etc) in a pound
2. (Law)
a. to seize (chattels, etc) by legal right
b. to take possession of (a document, evidence, etc) and hold in legal custody
3. (Physical Geography) to collect (water) in a reservoir or dam, as for irrigation
4. to seize or appropriate
imˈpoundable adj
imˈpoundage, imˈpoundment n
imˈpounder n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•pound

(ɪmˈpaʊnd)

v.t.
1. to shut up in or as if in a pound; confine.
2. to seize and retain in custody of the law.
[1545–55]
im•pound′a•ble, adj.
im•pound′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

impound


Past participle: impounded
Gerund: impounding

Imperative
impound
impound
Present
I impound
you impound
he/she/it impounds
we impound
you impound
they impound
Preterite
I impounded
you impounded
he/she/it impounded
we impounded
you impounded
they impounded
Present Continuous
I am impounding
you are impounding
he/she/it is impounding
we are impounding
you are impounding
they are impounding
Present Perfect
I have impounded
you have impounded
he/she/it has impounded
we have impounded
you have impounded
they have impounded
Past Continuous
I was impounding
you were impounding
he/she/it was impounding
we were impounding
you were impounding
they were impounding
Past Perfect
I had impounded
you had impounded
he/she/it had impounded
we had impounded
you had impounded
they had impounded
Future
I will impound
you will impound
he/she/it will impound
we will impound
you will impound
they will impound
Future Perfect
I will have impounded
you will have impounded
he/she/it will have impounded
we will have impounded
you will have impounded
they will have impounded
Future Continuous
I will be impounding
you will be impounding
he/she/it will be impounding
we will be impounding
you will be impounding
they will be impounding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been impounding
you have been impounding
he/she/it has been impounding
we have been impounding
you have been impounding
they have been impounding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been impounding
you will have been impounding
he/she/it will have been impounding
we will have been impounding
you will have been impounding
they will have been impounding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been impounding
you had been impounding
he/she/it had been impounding
we had been impounding
you had been impounding
they had been impounding
Conditional
I would impound
you would impound
he/she/it would impound
we would impound
you would impound
they would impound
Past Conditional
I would have impounded
you would have impounded
he/she/it would have impounded
we would have impounded
you would have impounded
they would have impounded
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impound - take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authorityimpound - take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authority; "The FBI seized the drugs"; "The customs agents impounded the illegal shipment"; "The police confiscated the stolen artwork"
take - take into one's possession; "We are taking an orphan from Romania"; "I'll take three salmon steaks"
condemn - appropriate (property) for public use; "the county condemned the land to build a highway"
sequester - requisition forcibly, as of enemy property; "the estate was sequestered"
garnish, garnishee - take a debtor's wages on legal orders, such as for child support; "His employer garnished his wages in order to pay his debt"
distrain - confiscate by distress
2.impound - place or shut up in a pound; "pound the cows so they don't stray"
restrain, confine, hold - to close within bounds, limit or hold back from movement; "This holds the local until the express passengers change trains"; "About a dozen animals were held inside the stockade"; "The illegal immigrants were held at a detention center"; "The terrorists held the journalists for ransom"
pound up, pound - shut up or confine in any enclosure or within any bounds or limits; "The prisoners are safely pounded"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

impound

verb confiscate, appropriate, seize, commandeer, sequester, expropriate, sequestrate The police arrested him and impounded the cocaine.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
takavarikoida

impound

[ɪmˈpaʊnd] VT [+ vehicle] → retener, retirar de la vía pública; [+ goods] → confiscar, incautar; [+ dog] → llevar a la perrera municipal (Jur) [+ evidence] → recoger
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

impound

[ɪmˈpaʊnd] vtconfisquer, saisir
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

impound

vt
(= seize) goods, assets, contrabandbeschlagnahmen
cattleeinsperren; carabschleppen (lassen)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

impound

[ɪmˈpaʊnd] vt (gen) → sequestrare, confiscare; (stray animal) → rinchiudere
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
There are approximately 25 known coal ash impoundments which are already closed in the state.
Adams at Bonefish & Tarpon Trust and Shenkerat Florida Institute of Technology had some ideas on how to measure the productivity of those nursery habitats, improve them and--importantly--verify those improvements so that the Bee Gum project might be used as a model for similar mosquito control impoundments around the state.
The 2015 rule regulates how CCR generated from electric utilities and independent power producers are managed in surface impoundments and landfills.
Standard Guidelines for the Design, Installation, and Operation and Maintenance of Stormwater Impoundments
Abstract--Slow growth of black crappies (Pomoxis nigromaculatus (Lesueur)) is common in small impoundments and often results in populations with small size structure.
"The rule is targeting very clearly the continued operations of surface impoundments," says Roewer, adding that most surface impoundments could close and another rule on coal ash expected this fall could place additional burden on those that remain.
Applied marine sciences is focused at the Centre of Applied Marine Sciences (CAMS), with the SEACAMS project already actively engaging in collaborative research to investigate the impacts of tidal impoundments.
We hunt almost the whole month of November, but the ducks are not even here yet (except for the impoundments and that can be iffy).
However, the balance of power changed as a result of President Richard Nixon, who expanded the scope and magnitude of Presidential impoundments, holding back between 17 and 20 percent of controllable expenditures between 1969 and 1972.