impredicative


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impredicative

(ˌɪmprəˈdɪkətɪv)
adj
(Logic) logic (of a definition) given in terms that require quantification over a range that includes that which is to be defined, as having all the properties of a great general where one of the properties as ascribed must be that property itself. Compare predicative2
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Menzel gets around this difficulty by appealing to what philosophers call an impredicative definition, which is a definition that generalizes over a totality to which the entity being defined belongs.
But this is an impredicative definition: it invokes the totality of elements to which the "I" belongs.
The question of the admissibility of impredicative or circular identity criteria is investigated in the light of the view that is articulated.
Concepts such as multi-scale mosaic effects and impredicative loop analysis stretch the imagination, yet at the same time open the door to new opportunities for integrating social and ecological components while "surfing" the complexity of time.
Potter claims that Frege adopted an impredicative conception of the numbers in order to advance beyond demonstrating their infinity by appeal to the realm of thoughts, and argues that this impredicativity leads to two "unattractive" choices: "if .
In particular, we are concerned with languages whose type-theoretic core combines subtyping and impredicative polymorphism in the style of System F [Girard 1972; Reynolds 1974].
This issignificant because it makes the construction of models much easier than for impredicative calculi.
no totality can contain members definable only in terms of this totality) makes impredicative definitions impossible and forces a kind of constructivity.
Plantinga eludes the classical argument by distinguishing between predicative and impredicative singular propositions, affirming that the subject of the former, if true, has existence (e.
Ordinary calculus, as taught to freshmen and sophomores, assumes certain things about existence, leading to impredicative assumptions that are inherently non-computational in nature [2].
The notion of an indefinitely extensible concept and their characterization are, no doubt, crucial in appraising the consequences of the paradoxes (and the legitimacy of impredicative definitions): Dummett's book on Frege ends by asking a pointed question of the philosophy of mathematics.
Not imagining that, in the central cases, any such "explanation" is called for, Boolos inevitably construes Dummett's sympathies as lying with a much stronger version of the vicious circle principle, one that prohibits quantification over impredicative totalities.